Giants catchers have hit .222 since Buster Posey went down

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In researching yet another aspect of the Dodgers’ ineptitude Eric Stephen of True Blue LA stumbled across an interesting stat about the Giants, noting that San Francisco catchers have hit just .222 with a .647 OPS since Buster Posey’s season-ending ankle injury.

At the time of the injury Posey was hitting .284 with a .756 OPS and he batted .305 with an .862 OPS in winning Rookie of the Year honors last season, so the dropoff behind the plate has been massive.

Eli Whiteside and Chris Stewart have split time pretty evenly in Posey’s absence, with Whiteside starting 29 times compared to 20 starts by Stewart.

Over the weekend the Giants promoted a third catcher, Hector Sanchez, but the 21-year-old prospect hasn’t started a game yet and isn’t expected to see much action despite hitting .302 with an .802 OPS in 67 games between Single-A and Double-A. Sanchez has terrible plate discipline and a grand total of 25 career games above Single-A, so odds are he’d be overmatched right now anyway, but if the Giants felt it was worth calling him up why not give him a shot instead of the .222-hitting veteran duo?

Tom Ricketts says the Cubs don’t have any more money

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Cubs owner Tom Ricketts met the media in Mesa, Arizona today and said a couple of things that were fun.

First, he addressed the controversy that arose earlier this month when emails of his father’s — family patriarch Joe Ricketts — were leaked, showing him forwarding and approvingly commenting on racist jokes. Ricketts apologized for those serving as a “distraction” for the Cubs which, OK. He also said “Those aren’t the values our family was raised with… I never heard my father say anything remotely racist.” If you choose to believe that a 77-year-old conservative guy who loves racist emails — who once spearheaded an anti-Obama ad campaign that required a “literate African-American” as its spokesman — hasn’t said racist stuff a-plenty, that’s between you and your credulity.

More relevant to the 2019 Cubs is this:

The Cubs aren’t in the same position as some other contenders in that (a) they don’t have a cheap payroll; and (b) are not obvious candidates for the big free agents like Harper or Machado, but I still find that comment pretty rich for an owner of one of baseball’s marquee franchises in a non-salary cap league. If nothing else, it’s an admission by Ricketts that he, like the other owners, consider the Luxury Tax to be a defacto salary cap.