With no fans to fill seats, Marlins close upper deck

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After a good start the Marlins have plummeted to last place in the NL East at 43-48 and rank dead last among MLB teams in attendance with 17,101 per game.

And that’s tickets sold, which as I learned while attending games at Dodger Stadium a couple times last week can be incredibly misleading.

With no fans to fill the seats the Marlins have decided to simply close off the entire upper deck in Sun Life Stadium, with spokesman P.J. Loyello telling Clark Spencer of the Miami Herald that “it was an operational decision” and “we don’t sell a whole lot of upper deck seats.”

This way the Marlins won’t have to actually hire ushers or security officers or anyone else to watch over the empty sections and the few fans who have upper deck season tickets will be “upgraded” to better seats, which they were probably already doing on their own unofficially each game.

I realize the Marlins closing off entire sections of their ballpark because no one sits there is prime joke material, but they’re actually not the first team to do so. Back when the Twins were still in the Metrodome they covered the worst seats in right field with a giant white (and eventually brownish-white from dirt) sheet that formed a makeshift tent over the empty seats and also had pictures of the players with their numbers retired. And there are other examples too.

Dodger Stadium might have followed suit, except the team couldn’t afford the white sheet. Rimshot?

The Giants are considering Pablo Sandoval at second base

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Pablo Sandoval could be tabbed to play second base in the near future, per a report from John Shea of the San Francisco Chronicle. According to Shea, Sandoval has been spotted taking grounders at second during pre-game warm-ups and may be considering switching to the keystone on a part-time basis.

It wouldn’t be the weirdest thing the 31-year-old corner infielder has done this year — that distinction goes to the flawless inning of relief he pitched in a blowout loss against the Dodgers last month. But it would represent a pretty notable departure from his comfort zone even so; Sandoval has primarily manned first and third base throughout his 11-year career in the majors and has also taken a few reps at DH during his resurgence with the Giants in 2018.

Of course, this wouldn’t necessarily be a permanent switch for Sandoval. As Shea points out, the Giants are thin on middle infielders after losing Joe Panik to a torn UCL in his left thumb and backup Alen Hanson to a left hamstring strain. Provided he can get up to speed quickly (no easy feat, according to infield coach Ron Wotus), he’d give the club some added depth behind Kelby Tomlinson and Miguel Gomez until Panik is ready to take the field again. Sandoval has impressed at the plate this spring, batting a healthy .270/.329/.429 with six extra-base hits and a .757 through 70 plate appearances.