Juan Castro retires, joins Dodgers front office

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After 17 seasons in the big leagues — yes, 17 seasons — Juan Castro announced his retirement Sunday and took a job as a special assistant in the Dodgers front office.

Now, granted, Castro spent a lot of those 17 seasons playing in the minors, too.  He had one at-bat in 1999, three in 2010, four in 1995 and 14 this year.  But for 17 straight seasons, Castro got a chance to put on a major league uniform at least once.

And, oddly enough, Castro played for just five teams.  He opened and finished his career with the Dodgers, spending parts of eight seasons with the team.  He also served two stints and played eight seasons with the Reds.

His best season came with Cincinnati in 2003, when he hit .253/.290/.388 with a career-high nine homers in 320 at-bats.  It was his only season over 300 at-bats.

He ends his career with a .229/.268/.327 line, 36 homers and 234 RBI in 2,627 at-bats.  That .595 OPS is the worst of any player to have at least 2,000 plate appearances since 1990:

1. Castro – .595
2. Matt Walbeck – .596
3. Rey Ordonez – .600
4. John McDonald – .601
5. Jose Lind – .604
6. Tony Pena Sr. – 607
7. Alvaro Espinoza – .608
8. Mike Benjamin – .617
9. Felix Fermin – .617
10. Cesar Izturis – .618

So, no, Castro wasn’t a very good hitter.  He was also far from a speedster, stealing just five bases in 14 lifetime attempts.  Still, 17 years is awfully impressive, and it sounds like he has a nice career ahead of him in coaching or in the front office, depending on which route he wants to go.

Video: Javier Báez jukes David Freese to avoid tag at first base

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Cubs shortstop Javier Báez pulled off one of the best jukes you’ll see, avoiding the tag from David Freese on a play at first base in the second inning of Tuesday night’s game against the Dodgers. Báez barely made contact with a Kenta Maeda pitch well outside the strike zone, tapping it towards Freese. Báez halted his momentum, juking Freese while he attempted to apply the tag, then dove into first base.

Dodgers manager Dave Roberts attempted to argue that Báez went out of the baseline, but the umpires’ no-call stood and Báez had himself a single. He would end up stranded on base, unfortunately for him and the Cubs.