The Dayton Dragons are about to sell out their 815th straight game

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Hey Red Sox Nation: your sellout streak is nice. In a quaint, small-scale kind of way. One day, if you’re truly committed, you can show devotion like the fans of the Dayton Dragons have done for the past 11 years.

Eleven years in which they have sold out every single home game. That’s 815 games in a row. Every game they’ve played since they moved to Dayton in 2000. When they get their 815th, they’ll break the all-time professional sports record, currently held by the Portland Trailblazers.

OK, fine, tickets for the Dragons aren’t quite as pricey as they are at Fenway, so I’ll grant that there is an apples and oranges thing going on here. But you can’t deny how impressive the Dragons’ streak is.  Especially in an area like Dayton, with an economy that can be charitably referred to as “beyond crappy.” There’s a season ticket waiting list for the Dragons. A wait list for season tickets to a Class-A team.  It’s around 9,000 names long. In a park that holds just over 8,000.  Seriously, someone could kill every single current season ticket holder for the Dragons this afternoon, and you’d still be wait-listed.

The key is really the ballpark. It’s fun. It’s accessible. They keep it really clean and well-maintained and are huge on customer service there.  Reds’ prospects come and go, but people always have a reason to go to Fifth Third Field.

Or maybe they’re just coming out to see Delino Deshields. He’s the manager. And I just think that’s neat.

Video: Javier Báez jukes David Freese to avoid tag at first base

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Cubs shortstop Javier Báez pulled off one of the best jukes you’ll see, avoiding the tag from David Freese on a play at first base in the second inning of Tuesday night’s game against the Dodgers. Báez barely made contact with a Kenta Maeda pitch well outside the strike zone, tapping it towards Freese. Báez halted his momentum, juking Freese while he attempted to apply the tag, then dove into first base.

Dodgers manager Dave Roberts attempted to argue that Báez went out of the baseline, but the umpires’ no-call stood and Báez had himself a single. He would end up stranded on base, unfortunately for him and the Cubs.