Jose Reyes heading to the disabled list

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 Adam Rubin of ESPN NewYork reports that the Mets have “put the wheels in motion” toward placing Jose Reyes on the disabled list.  Which, given that I figured all of that involves nothing more than an email or a fax or something, can’t be a terribly complicated procedure requiring wheels to actually be put in motion, but it’s a nice turn of phrase all the same.

Or it could mean that there’s a road trip afoot: Rubin reports that Nick Evans is going to be called up from Buffalo, and given that the Mets are all the way out west right now. perhaps the wheels refers to Evans driving across the country to join the team, with severe budget limitations keeping him from flying. Which would be kind of fun, actually. On the way to California Evans could see the sights. Get in adventures. That kind of thing.
On a more serious note, this obviously means that Reyes’ hamstring is not doing so well. Rubin reports that he couldn’t run or do much of anything yesterday, and that the final decision to put him on the DL will come if and when Reyes is unable to run before today’s game, which is supremely likely.
Given how critical Reyes has been for the Mets this year, better to DL him now, with the All-Star break ahead, and make sure that he’s good to go for the second half.

Mariano Rivera elected to Baseball Hall of Fame unanimously

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Former Yankees closer Mariano Rivera deservingly became the first player ever inducted into the Hall of Fame unanimously, receiving votes from all 425 writers who submitted ballots. Previously, the closest players to unanimous induction were Ken Griffey, Jr. (99.32% in 2016), Tom Seaver (98.84% in 1992), Nolan Ryan (98.79% in 1999), Cal Ripken, Jr. (98.53%), Ty Cobb (98.23% in 1936), and George Brett (98.19% in 1999).

Because so many greats were not enshrined in Cooperstown unanimously, many voters in the past argued against other players getting inducted unanimously, withholding their votes for otherwise deserving players. That Griffey — both one of the greatest outfielders of all time and one of the most popular players of all time — wasn’t voted in unanimously in 2016, for example, seemed to signal that no player ever would. Now that Rivera has been, this tired argument about voting unanimity can be laid to rest.

Derek Jeter will appear on the Hall of Fame ballot for the first time next year. He may become the second player ever to be elected unanimously. David Ortiz appears on the 2022 ballot and could be No. 3. Now that Rivera has broken through, these are possibilities whereas before they might not have been.

Another tired argument around Hall of Fame voting concerns whether or not a player is a “first ballot” Hall of Famer. Some voters think getting enshrined in a player’s first year of eligibility is a greater honor than getting in any subsequent year. I’m not sure what it will take to get rid of this argument — other than the electorate getting younger and more open-minded — but at least we have made progress on at least one bad Hall of Fame take.