Frank McCourt notices the depositions of Bud Selig, other MLB executives

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One of the questions I keep getting asked by radio hosts and others is how the Dodgers’ bankruptcy differs from that of the Rangers or the Cubs.  My answer is that, unlike those bankruptcies, this is really an adversarial action more than a reorganizational kind of thing.

This is the sort of reason why: Frank McCourt intends to take the depositions of Selig and six other Major League Baseball executives in the next couple of weeks. The purpose: to establish that it was baseball’s intent to whack McCourt and seize the Dodgers all along.*

And hell, maybe it was. Guess they’ll have to ask Selig about it.  What I can’t understand, however, is the direct significance this would have on the bankruptcy. By the filing itself, McCourt is admitting he can’t pay his bills. While it’s possible that he’ll convince someone that baseball was out to get him, in the end, the court is there to determine what is in the best interests of the Dodgers’ creditors, not who was more righteous in the leadup to last week’s filing.

Or am I missing something here?

 

*Pfun Pfact: McCourt’s lawyers misspelled Bud Selig’s real first name — Allan — three times on the depo notice. That’s some fine lawyerin’ there, Lou.

Anthony DeSclafani crushed a grand slam for his first career home run

Anthony DeSclafani
AP Images
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Reds right-hander Anthony DeSclafani put on a show during Saturday’s matinee against the Cubs. Up 2-1 in the third inning, the hurler hooked a Brian Duensing fastball over the left field fence for his first career home run — and first career grand slam:

Grand slams are impressive no matter the player or situation, but they’re made all the more special in rare circumstances like this one. Not only is DeSclafani the first pitcher to deliver a grand slam in 2018, but he’s the first Reds hurler to do so in nearly 60 years. Per MLB.com’s Brian Scott Rippee, right-hander Bob Purkey was the last to hit a slam for the Reds in 1959, when he took Cubs reliever John Buzhardt deep in the third inning of a 12-3 drubbing.

The 28-year-old righty had a decent outing on the mound as well, holding the Cubs to two runs, four walks, and three strikeouts over 6 1/3 innings before passing the ball to reliever Michael Lorenzen. Entering Saturday, he carried a 2-1 record in three games, with a 4.60 ERA, 2.3 BB/9 and 8.6 SO/9 across 15 2/3 innings — not too shabby for someone who hasn’t pitched in the majors since 2016.

The Reds currently lead 8-2 in the bottom of the seventh.