Frank McCourt notices the depositions of Bud Selig, other MLB executives

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One of the questions I keep getting asked by radio hosts and others is how the Dodgers’ bankruptcy differs from that of the Rangers or the Cubs.  My answer is that, unlike those bankruptcies, this is really an adversarial action more than a reorganizational kind of thing.

This is the sort of reason why: Frank McCourt intends to take the depositions of Selig and six other Major League Baseball executives in the next couple of weeks. The purpose: to establish that it was baseball’s intent to whack McCourt and seize the Dodgers all along.*

And hell, maybe it was. Guess they’ll have to ask Selig about it.  What I can’t understand, however, is the direct significance this would have on the bankruptcy. By the filing itself, McCourt is admitting he can’t pay his bills. While it’s possible that he’ll convince someone that baseball was out to get him, in the end, the court is there to determine what is in the best interests of the Dodgers’ creditors, not who was more righteous in the leadup to last week’s filing.

Or am I missing something here?

 

*Pfun Pfact: McCourt’s lawyers misspelled Bud Selig’s real first name — Allan — three times on the depo notice. That’s some fine lawyerin’ there, Lou.

Orioles set new MLB record with 259th home run allowed

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Update (9:04 PM EST): The game went into a rain delay with one out in the bottom of the fifth inning of a 2-2 tie, so the game isn’t official yet. Which means the Orioles aren’t yet the official record holders.

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A third-inning solo home run by Austin Meadows off of Asher Wojciechowski on Thurday night marked the 259th home run Orioles pitching has allowed this season, setting a new major league record, per MASN’s Roch Kubatko. The previous record was held by the 2016 Reds at 258. Willie Adames hit No. 260, a game-tying solo shot in the fifth inning. The Orioles will have 34 more games to add on to their record after tonight.

The Yankees have famously accounted for 61 of the 260 home runs (23.5%) against Orioles pitchers this season. The Red Sox are next at 28 followed by the Twins and Blue Jays at 23 each.

David Hess has accounted for the most home runs on the O’s staff, yielding 28 dingers. Dylan Bundy is next at 25 homers allowed.

The Orioles are not the only team that will pass the 2016 Reds. The Mariners are on pace to allow 275 home runs. The Yankees, 266. Phillies, 262. Angels, 259. Pretty amazing.