Joe Mauer was called out for his pitch selection over the weekend

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That work that Joe Mauer is getting a first base is clearly designed to (a) get his bat in the lineup more often; and (b) potentially cover for what could be the loss of Justin Morneau for the rest of the season.  But there’s at least one guy who may be happy to see Mauer at first for another reason. That guy is Twins reliever Jose Mijares.

I had missed this over the weekend, but on Friday, Mijares got a bit angry at Mauer over the pitches he called during Mijares’ brief and unsuccessful seventh inning appearance against Prince Fielder. What’s more, he took the unusual step of calling out Mauer for it after the game:

“I don’t know what was going on with Mauer,” Mijares said after the Twins fell back to 10 games below .500. “He never put the sign for breaking ball. Never. Fastball, fastball, fastball. Fastball. Last pitch, I’d like to throw a breaking ball. He said fastball. OK.”

Ron Gardenhire wasn’t happy with the pitch selection either, though it seems that he placed blame on both Mijares and Mauer:

“A lefthander’s gotta come in and hopefully spin some pitches. If you just throw fastballs — I could leave a righthander in to throw fastballs. That’s the way I look at it.”

In all, the lefty Mijares threw six pitches, all of them fastballs. Why, if he felt so strongly about it, he didn’t shake off Mauer or have a little conference about it on the mound is an open question. And of course, if that last fastball to Fielder was any good, Fielder wouldn’t have smacked it for a go-ahead double. For Mauer’s part, he said that Mijares’ slider had been erratic lately, and he worried about walking Fielder. Though, really, a walk to Fielder may not have been awful there.

Either way, it’s not often that you see a reliever — let alone the manager — quibble with pitch selection like this after a game. Especially in a way that calls out an MVP catcher like Mauer.

Marlins home run sculpture is going, going, gone!

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Not long after the new ownership group bought the Miami Marlins, face of the franchise Derek Jeter made it clear that he wanted the home runs sculpture beyond the outfield fence gone. He simply doesn’t like it aesthetically and many think that, among Jeter’s goals, he’d like to erase any trace of Jeff Loria’s legacy, which includes the sculpture.

The problem: the sculpture is not Jeter’s to remove. The sculpture is public property, purchased as part of the Art in Public Places program, which requires art to be installed for the public in county-owned buildings, which includes Marlins Park. Miami-Dade officials have said that moving it was not possible as the sculpture was “not moveable” and was “permanently installed: as it was designed specifically for Marlins Park. And that’s before you get into how logistically complicated it would be to move it. It’s seven stories tall and is connected to a hydraulic system, plumbing and there’s electricity.

What Jeter wants, however, Jeter eventually gets. From the Miami Herald:

The Miami Marlins won county permission on Tuesday to move its home-run sculpture out of Marlins Park to the plaza outside . . . In its new location outside, “Homer” will still turn on for home runs, as well as at the end of every home win and every day at 3:05 p.m., an homage to Miami’s original area code.

It may or may not be moved before Opening Day, but once it is moved there will be a new seating and standing room only area for spectators where the sculpture currently sits.