And That Happened: Monday’s scores and highlights

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Tigers 4, Blue Jays 2: Jhonny Peralta had an RBI triple that ended up being the game winner, but this game really belonged to Jim Leyland, who had one of the better arguments with an ump this year, mocking his change-of-call in grand gestures, thereby entertaining the hometown fans on the way to his ejection. And entertainment aside, the ump got the call right I think, so the fact that Leyland really had no argument made it even better. No, we shouldn’t find this unprofessional kind of thing amusing, but sorry, I do. And to keep the comedy going, I hope he pays his inevitable fine in pennies. Preferably of this type.

Dodgers 15, Twins 0: Twenty-five hits for L.A., with every starter not only getting a hit, but getting multiple hits.  Gee, if hits were dollars …

Cubs 7, Rockies 3: Carlos Pena and Aramis Ramirez each hit two homers. Carlos Gonzalez did too, but since his team lost, no glory for him.

Reds 5, Rays 0: Mike Leake threw six shutout innings and Brandon Phillips went 4 for 5 with a couple of RBI, no doubt motivated by being passed up by Rickie Weeks in the All-Star balloting. Wait: I’m guessing these guys don’t care too much and would rather have the days off at this point, so like, never mind.

Braves 3, Mariners 1: I’ll be damned. I had a bet with a friend that this game would go 25 innings with neither team scoring. Perhaps I was being unfair. Brian McCann and Freddie Freeman with homers. Jason Heyward hit leadoff, which is kind of interesting.

Angels 4, Nationals 3: Fire Davey Johnson! Oh, wait, first game. Let’s cut him some slack. Maicer Izturis with a the bases-loaded single in the 10th. It’s nice that L.A. won, but Jordan Walden blew his third straight save, sending this one to extras, so that’s a problem.

Padres 4, Royals 3: Mat Latos didn’t pitch fabulously, but he won. He also reached on a double, didn’t run the bases fabulously — he should have scored from third on a groundout but froze — but he ended up scoring anyway on a wild pitch. Sometimes you’re given a margin of error in life.

Indians 5, Diamondbacks 4: Orlando Cabrera hit a homer with two outs in the top of the ninth to give Cleveland the win. He is a man who has never accepted the creed that others have the right to stop him.

UPDATE: WEEI denies it will change Red Sox broadcasts to a talk show format

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UPDATE: WEEI is pushing back on this report, denying that it is true. Finn’s source for the story was the agency posting job listings which said that, yes, WEEI was looking to do the talk show format. WEEI is now saying that the agency was merely speculating and that it will still be a traditional broadcast.

Both WEEI and Finn say they will have full reports soon, so I guess we’ll see.

9:47 AM: WEEI carries Boston Red Sox games on the radio in the northeast. For the past three seasons, Tim Neverett and Joe Castiglione have been the broadcast team. Following what was reportedly a difficult relationship with the station, Neverett has allowed his contract with WEEI to end, however, meaning that the station needs to do something else with their broadcast.

It seems that they’re going to do something radical. Chad Finn of the Boston Globe:

There were industry rumors about possible changes all season long. One, which multiple sources have said was a genuine consideration, had WEEI dropping the concept of a conventional radio baseball broadcast to make the call of the game sound more like a talk show.

That was yesterday. Just now, Finn confirmed it:

I have no idea how that will work in practice but I can’t imagine this turning out well. At all.

Hiring talk show hots to call games — adding opinion and humor and stuff while still doing a more or less straightforward broadcast — would probably be fine. It might even be fun. But this is not saying that’s what is happening. It says it’s changing it to a talk show “format.” I have no idea how that would work. A few well-done exceptions aside, there is nothing more annoying than sports talk radio. It tends to be constant, empty chatter about controversies real or imagined and overheated either way. It usually puts the host in the center of everything, forcing listeners — often willingly — to adopt his point of view. It’s almost always boorish narcissism masquerading as “analysis.”

But even if it was the former idea — talk show hosts doing a conventional broadcast — it’d still be hard to pull off given how bad so many talk show hosts are. There are a couple of sports talk hosts I like personally and I think do a good job, most are pretty bad, including the ones WEEI has historically preferred.

Which is to stay that this is bound to be awful. And that’s if they even remember to pay attention to the game. Imagine them taking a few calls while the Red Sox mount a rally, get sidetracked arguing over whether some player is “overrated” or whatever and listeners get completely lost.

My thoughts and prayers go out to Red Sox fans who listen to the games on the radio.