Manny Ramirez is the Dodgers’ biggest creditor

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Whenever you file for bankruptcy, you have to file a list of your creditors.  The Dodgers filed theirs — see the whole filing here — and it’s a fun list:

  • Manny Ramirez, $20,992,086
  • Andruw Jones, $11,075,000
  • Hiroki Kuroda, $4,483,516
  • Rafael Furcal, $3,725,275
  • Chicago White Sox, $3,500,000
  • Ted Lilly, $3,423,077
  • Zach Lee, $3,400,000
  • Kaz Ishii, $3,300,000
  • Juan Uribe, $3,241,758
  • Matt Guerrier, $3,090,659

Other creditors include: Marquis Grissom — who hasn’t played for the Dodgers forever — and Vin Scully, who is owed $152,778.  I don’t care if the other guys get stiffed, but if Scully doesn’t get paid, I’m takin’ a blowtorch to Frank’s mansion. One of ’em anyway.

My favorite part, of course, is that Manny Ramirez is the top creditor. Someone can correct me if I’m wrong, but it’s my understanding that creditors usually have to make legal appearances in bankruptcy proceedings. I can’t wait to see Manny’s legal filings. I assume that they’ll be hand-written, in either crayon or with the burnt end of a pizza crust, on letterhead from hotel on the planet Mars.  And he’ll send it via some sort of royal courier. Or by carrier pigeon.

Rakuten Golden Eagles sign Jabari Blash

Jabari Blash
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Former Angels outfielder Jabari Blash has signed a one-year deal with the Tohoku Rakuten Golden Eagles of Nippon Professional Baseball, the team announced Friday. Per the Japan Times, the deal is said to be worth around $1.06 million. Blash was released from his contract with the Angels at the end of November.

The 29-year-old outfielder has had a rough go of it in the majors, where he failed to duplicate the promising results he delivered in the minors. While he consistently batted above .250 with 20-30 home runs per season at the Double- and Triple-A level, he petered out in back-to-back gigs with the Padres and Angels and slumped toward a .103/.200/.128 finish across 45 PA for Anaheim in 2018.

The hope, of course, is that the environment in NPB will help him get a better handle on his issues at the plate — in a best case scenario, resulting in a full-scale transformation that could make him more marketable to MLB teams in the future. To that end, Blash expects to be utilized as a cleanup batter in the Eagles’ lineup and will focus on assisting the club as they make a run toward the Japan Series.