History is not on Jim Riggleman’s side

12 Comments

As I mused yesterday, two competing explanations for Jim Riggleman’s departure from the Nationals are (1) a fit of pique or genuine disgust which forced his sudden resignation; or (2) a calculation that, if he wasn’t going to be the Nats’ manager in 2012, he’d have a much better shot at landing a new job by leaving now than waiting out the year as a lame duck.

Only Riggleman can say which explanation — or a third one we haven’t thought of — is the correct one.  But if it was a calculation about setting himself up for future employment, he may be in for a rude awakening. That is, at least if historical precedent controls.

Over at The Platoon Advantage, The Common Man runs down the experiences of several managers who, like Riggleman, just up and quit in the middle of the season for whatever reason.  A few of them got jobs again, though they weren’t exactly treated as hot properties. Many of them didn’t get jobs again.  The fact that, as The Common Man notes, there are only a few managerial jobs and many, many men who would like to fill them tends to mitigate the efficacy of the dramatic in-season resignation as career enhancer, you see.

Braves are targeting Dallas Keuchel

Getty Images
Leave a comment

LAS VEGAS — Let’s start our first weekday of the Winter Meetings with some rumors and speculation. We’ll have a good bit of that until, you know, something actually happens.

First up: Dallas Keuchel, the top free agent pitcher remaining on the market. Jon Heyman says the Braves, who are in the market for a starter, are targeting him. In this they are not alone, as the Phillies, who missed out on Patrick Corbin, and the Reds, who would like a pitcher who doesn’t allow a lot of fly balls are each reported to be focused on Keuchel as well. There was a random report that the Blue Jays were interested in him too, but that seems off to me given where they are on their rebuild.

Keuchel, who will turn 31 on New Year’s Day, was 12-11 in 34 starts last year, posting an ERA of 3.74 in 204.2 innings. His peripherals have declined fairly consistently since his Cy Young season in 2015, so the question is whether the team that signs him is paying for his past or for what he might reasonably be expected to provide in the future.