Fox won’t have Frank McCourt’s back if he takes the team into bankruptcy

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One possible strategy — outside of extreme and acrimonious litigation — Frank McCourt could pursue to thwart Major League Baseball’s seizure of the team when he fails to meet payroll is to put the team into bankruptcy.  I’m not a bankruptcy expert — not by a longshot — but generally speaking a bankruptcy filing puts the brakes on everything related to the asset in question. It stays pending lawsuits and collection actions and, in all likelihood, would temporarily halt Bud Selig from kicking McCourt out of the ownership chair.

Of course, that halt in the action would be intended for the bankruptcy court to get a handle on the assets and liabilities of the club, and during that time it would be incumbent upon McCourt to demonstrate how, exactly, he planned to get the team out of bankruptcy and up and running again.  And to that end, there’s a complication. As usual, here’s Bill Shaikin of the Los Angeles Times:

Fox would not stand by Frank McCourt if the Dodgers owner were to ask a bankruptcy judge to order approval of the television contract rejected this week by Commissioner Bud Selig, two people familiar with the matter said Wednesday.

The Fox position would “severely complicate” any plans McCourt might have to file bankruptcy as a way to retain control of the Dodgers, said Rob Kampfner of White and Case, the firm that represented the incoming owners of the Texas Rangers through that club’s bankruptcy proceedings last year … “Frank would go in and wouldn’t have an exit strategy,” Kampfner said.

This is totally Richard III territory here. I love that part at the end where the dude gets abandoned by his allies, he can’t find a horse on Bosworth Field and then he gets hacked down.

Kinsler back with Rangers as special assistant to GM Young

Kevin Jairaj-USA TODAY Sports
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ARLINGTON, Texas — Former Texas Rangers second baseman Ian Kinsler returned to the team as a special assistant to general manager Chris Young, his teammate in the organization’s minor league system nearly two decades ago.

Young said that Kinsler, who was part of the franchise’s only two World Series teams in 2010 and 2011, will be heavily involved in player development and providing mentorship to both players and staff.

Kinsler, a four-time All-Star, was part of a World Series championship with the Boston Red Sox in 2018, a year before his retirement. Kinsler played 14 seasons in the major leagues and spent the last three years in the front office of the San Diego Padres as a special assistant in baseball operations and player development. The 40-year-old has been living in the Dallas area, as he did throughout his playing career.

Kinsler played for the U.S. in the 2017 World Baseball Classic and Israel in last summer’s Olympics, and he will manage Israel in next month’s WBC.

Young and Kinsler were teammates for several weeks at Double-A Frisco in the summer of 2004, the same year the pitcher made his big league debut. They were in big league spring training together in 2005, then Young was traded after that season.

A 17th-round draft pick by Texas in 2003, Kinsler played 1,066 games for the Rangers from 2006-13, hitting .273 with 156 homers, 539 RBIs and 172 stolen bases. He hit .311 with a .422 on-base percentage in 34 postseason games. He was inducted into the team’s Hall of Fame last summer.

Kinsler hit .269 with 257 homers, 909 RBIs and 243 stolen bases in 1,888 career games overall with Texas, Detroit (2014-17), the Los Angeles Angels (2018), Boston (2018), and San Diego (2019). He is one of only two MLB second baseman with 30 homers and 30 stolen bases in multiple seasons, and had the only six-hit cycle in a nine-inning game since 1900 on April 15, 2009.