Players kick butt in their free agency walk years and slack off later, right? Um, no.

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It’s taken as a matter of faith that players go crazy in their free agent walk years, motivated by that big paycheck. And then that, after they get the fat deal, they themselves get fat and lazy and simply cash their checks. And sure, we all can cite examples of players who seem to fit this pattern.

But as Joe Sheehan writes over at Sports Illustrated today, it’s neither borne out by the statistical data nor does it tell the whole story. And here’s a big part of the story people miss:

The concept that players play best when motivated by potential free agency is as much a tale of managerial failure as it is one of player psychology. Front offices want to blame the player for failing to meet their expectations, rather than consider that the expectations were out of line.

Sheehan cites Gary Matthews Jr.’s deal with the Angels, but there are any number of players who got rich because their teams didn’t realize they were flukes. Yet we often blame the player for his regression as opposed to blaming management for the misjudgment.

It’s a good article that, no matter how many time the subject is revisited, people seem to reject the facts and go back to what they believe to be true.  Let’s read Joe’s piece today and try to remember it, OK?

Video: Ramon Torres hits little league home run in first at-bat of season

Jayne Kamin-Oncea/Getty Images
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The Royals recalled infielder Ramon Torres from Triple-A Omaha on Saturday. He didn’t get into a game until starting Thursday night’s game against the Rangers, batting ninth.

In the top of the second inning, facing Austin Bibens-Dirkx, Torres laced a single up the middle. Center fielder Delino DeShields charged in on it, attempting to keep Ryan Goins at second base, but the ball went right past his glove, through his legs, and nearly trickled all the way to the warning track. Goins scored easily and Torres was waved home, too. He managed to narrowly beat the throw, touching home plate with his left hand on a head-first slide.

The play was officially scored a single and a three-base error. Torres wasn’t credited with an RBI on the play. But at least the Royals got two runs out of it.