Padres sticking with rookie Anthony Rizzo amid slow start

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Anthony Rizzo has struggled in his first taste of the big leagues, going just 5-for-31 (.161) with one homer and 12 strikeouts since being called up two weeks ago, but the Padres have made it very clear that they won’t be benching or demoting the top prospect.

Here’s what manager Bud Black told Rob Terranova of the North County Times:

He’s going to play. He’s got a very good head on his shoulders, has poise,  and a great perspective on where he is right now for a 21-year-old. Now he needs time to continue to grow as a player and develop as a major-leaguer.

And here’s general manager Jed Hoyer:

He might be overswinging a little bit right now, but we have no doubt that he’s going to be a really good player. He’s just gonna go though some growing pains.

When a team commits to calling up a stud prospect at age 21 how he fares through two weeks should have absolutely zero impact on their plans. Rizzo, who was acquired from the Red Sox as part of the four-prospect package for Adrian Gonzalez this offseason, hit .365 with 16 homers, 20 doubles, and a 1.159 OPS in 52 games at Triple-A prior to the call-up. He’ll be just fine.

Brewers promote David Stearns from GM to president of baseball operations

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It used to be that the top dog in a team’s baseball operations department was the general manager. That has changed over the past several years with some combination of title inflation, a genuine addition of supervisory layers and, on some level, employe poaching insurance leading to the top dog now being called, usually, a “president of baseball operations.”

Brewers’ general manager David Stearns is the latest to assume that tile, as the club just announced that he has been promoted to Milwaukee’s president of baseball operations. He has also received a contract extension of unknown length.

Not a big shock given how well the Brewers did in 2018, winning the NL Central title and playing in the NLCS. It’s also worth noting — with a nod to that “employee poaching insurance” item above — that Stearns has drawn some interest from other organizations. It’s thus not unfair to see the promotion is both a thanks for a job well done and a means of keeping other teams’ hands off of him, as employees are generally not given permission to interview for lateral moves, but are given permission to interview for promotions.

The Mudville Nine may have wanted to steal him from Milwaukee, but for Stearns to get a promotion from where he is now would require the creation of some other lofty title.