Hideki Matsui might play in the outfield next week

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Avert your eyes, people. It sounds like Hideki Matsui may play in the outfield next week.

And as new A’s skipper Bob Melvin told Jane Lee and Tom Green of MLB.com, the main objective here isn’t just to make everyone feel really uncomfortable, but to keep Matsui in the lineup during interleague play.

“I want to keep him current and I want to keep him getting current at-bats and consistent at-bats because he’s done very well to this point,” Melvin said. “There’s a good chance you could see him get a start in the outfield, maybe once a series, then the other games doing the pinch-hitting thing. I’ve talked to him about it and he’s comfortable with it.”

The only catch is that if Matsui does make a start or two against the Mets and Phillies next week, it will be in right field, not his customary left field. Matsui has only played seven games in right field during his major league career and hasn’t made an appearance there since 2008 as a member of the Yankees.

Yadier Molina ties record for the most games caught with one team

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Yadier Molina has two World Series rings, multiple Gold Gloves, Platinum Gloves, All-Star appearances and a Silver Slugger award. He now has an all-time record too.

The record: the most games caught with one team. Last night he caught his 1756th career game with the Cardinals, with ties him with Gabby Hartnett of the Cubs, who last caught in 1941 and set the record in 1940, his last season with Chicago. Molina will break the record next time he dons the tools of ignorance, likely tonight against the Phillies.

Given how badly catchers get beaten up — and Molina has taken a beating at times in his career — and given how well mastery of the position leads to a catcher earning journeyman status, as it were, it’s quite a thing to catch that many games for one team.

Given that Molina is under contract with the Cardinals for two more seasons and has stated his desire to retire a Cardinal many times, he’s likely to put that record so far out of reach that it’ll likely take at least another 78 years to break it, if indeed it is ever broken.