Is the realignment issue really a gambit to make the DH universal?

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I’ve read several articles in which writers are at least somewhat positive and accepting of the recent realignment idea that has been floated. Derrick Goold of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch wrote the first meaty counterargument today, and it’s a pretty comprehensive one.

I’m not sold on every argument of course — I really don’t care if teams can’t put up “wild card champion” banners in parks and can’t make finishing out of the playoff race sound good by calling it “third place”  — but it’s an intellectual response to the idea as opposed to some emotional traditionalist claptrap you might be expected to hear whenever the idea of change is floated.

But even if I disagree with some of Goold’s criticisms, he makes a great point when it comes to how the idea of constant interleague series — as two 15-team leagues would require — would mess with team rosters due to the fact that clubs would have to switch between the DH game and the non-DH game far more often than they do now for the more sporadic interleague play.  And after detailing the issues with that, he reaches a conclusion that no one has really talked about it yet:

So let’s call this discussion, this talk of realignment, this Trojan horse what it really seems to be: an attempt to force the DH on the NL.

Whether that’s the main idea or merely a side effect, it does seem to be an eminently possible result of two fifteen team leagues. An alternative: loosening roster rules to deal with the changes, but that wouldn’t be ideal and wouldn’t necessarily placate a union that may truly want 16 extra designated hitters in order to sign off on such a plan.

In light of that, are you still cool with realignment?

Yu Darvish lands on 10-day disabled list again with triceps tendinitis

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Bad news for the Cubs’ Yu Darvish: The right-hander is headed back to the disabled list with right triceps tendinitis, the team announced Saturday. It’s the second such assignment for Darvish this season, but the first time he’s been sidelined with arm issues. Neither the severity of his injury nor a concrete timeframe for his recovery has been revealed yet, but the move is retroactive to May 23 and will allow him to come off the DL by June 2, assuming all goes well.

Prior to the injury, Darvish went 1-3 in eight starts with a 4.95 ERA, 4.7 BB/9 and 11.0 SO/9 through 40 innings. Needless to say, these aren’t the kind of results the Cubs were hoping to see after inking the righty to a six-year, $126 million contract back in February, though the circumstances affecting his performances appear to have largely been out of his control. He missed a start in early May after coming down with the flu and has struggled to pitch beyond the fifth inning in five of his eight starts to date.

The Cubs recalled left-hander Randy Rosario from Triple-A Iowa in a corresponding move. Rosario has yet to amass more than five career innings in the majors, but has impressed at Triple-A so far this year: he maintained an 0.97 ERA, 2.8 BB/9 and 6.1 SO/9 through 19 1/3 innings in 2018. As for Darvish’s next scheduled turn in the rotation, Tyler Chatwood is lined up to take the mound when the Cubs face off against the Giants in the series finale on Sunday. A starter for Monday night’s game has yet to be determined.