How not to solve the Astros’ problems

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Richard Justice has a story today in which he asks Lance Berkman about how the Astros should go about rebuilding when the new ownership group comes on board.

I can’t say I disagree with most of what Berkman says. Sure, he’s a little too kind to the Astros’ current rotation, but it’s not like he’s going to throw opponents under the bus in that kind of setting.  The general idea, though: keep the on-field management you have and think long term rather than short term is the right move.

I did have a chuckle at Justice’s intro to the article, however:

One of the things I hope Jim Crane does over the next few weeks is sit down with Jeff Bagwell and Craig Biggio about how the Astros got into this mess and how they can get out of it. Why wouldn’t Crane want the perspective of two of the best and smartest players this franchise has had?

How about this: because an overdeveloped sense of devotion and fealty to Biggio and Bagwell and all of the respectable veterany goodness that came with them is what got the Astros into trouble in the first place.  Maybe it’s not their fault — someone in that front office should have burnt things down and rebuilt after it became clear in the 2006 season that the Killer Bs Astros had peaked already — but the Astros’ central problem right now is a direct result of too much deference to those guys.

If Biggio and Bagwell actually have solid baseball ideas, great, let’s hear them. But their views on the matter should carry no more weight than anyone else’s because teams that successfully rebuild do so by looking to the future, not looking to the past.

Report: Angels to sign Cody Allen

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Ken Rosenthal of The Athletic reports that the Angels and reliever Cody Allen are in agreement on a one-year contract, pending a physical. The value of the contract is not yet known.

Allen, 30, was looking for an opportunity to close and the Angels can certainly provide that. He will likely be the favorite to break camp as the closer. 2018 was the roughest year of his career, however, as he finished with a 4.70 ERA, 27 saves, and a 80/33 K/BB ratio in 67 innings. Among Allen’s six full seasons, his 27.7 strikeout rate and 11.4 percent walk rate represented career-worsts. FanGraphs also shows him losing nearly a full MPH on his average fastball velocity.

The Angels lost closer Keynan Middleton to Tommy John surgery early last season and he likely won’t return until the second half of the 2019 season. Blake Parker, who handled save situations in Middleton’s place, was non-tendered by the Angels in November and ended up signing with the Twins. The closer’s role is Allen’s to lose, it seems.