How not to solve the Astros’ problems

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Richard Justice has a story today in which he asks Lance Berkman about how the Astros should go about rebuilding when the new ownership group comes on board.

I can’t say I disagree with most of what Berkman says. Sure, he’s a little too kind to the Astros’ current rotation, but it’s not like he’s going to throw opponents under the bus in that kind of setting.  The general idea, though: keep the on-field management you have and think long term rather than short term is the right move.

I did have a chuckle at Justice’s intro to the article, however:

One of the things I hope Jim Crane does over the next few weeks is sit down with Jeff Bagwell and Craig Biggio about how the Astros got into this mess and how they can get out of it. Why wouldn’t Crane want the perspective of two of the best and smartest players this franchise has had?

How about this: because an overdeveloped sense of devotion and fealty to Biggio and Bagwell and all of the respectable veterany goodness that came with them is what got the Astros into trouble in the first place.  Maybe it’s not their fault — someone in that front office should have burnt things down and rebuilt after it became clear in the 2006 season that the Killer Bs Astros had peaked already — but the Astros’ central problem right now is a direct result of too much deference to those guys.

If Biggio and Bagwell actually have solid baseball ideas, great, let’s hear them. But their views on the matter should carry no more weight than anyone else’s because teams that successfully rebuild do so by looking to the future, not looking to the past.

Phillies option Hector Neris to Triple-A

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The Phillies announced that they’ve optioned right-hander Hector Neris to Triple-A Lehigh Valley.

Nerris, who saved 26 games as the Phillies closer in 2017 and ten games in that role this year, has struggled this year, posting a 6.00 ERA in 30 appearances. While his strikeout and walk rates aren’t too far off what he was doing last year his hit rate has spiked and he’s currently allowing 10.3 safeties per nine. The wheels have come off of late, as he has allowed nine runs on 15 hits — five of them homers — over his last eight innings of work. Yesterday he allowed four runs in the ninth inning of a game the Phillies had led by five.

It was clear that Gabe Kapler had lost faith in Neris as a result, using him almost exclusively in low-leverage situations. That changed on Saturday, as Kapler used him in a save situation and said after the game that they were easing him back into his role. That plan obviously changed after yesterday’s meltdown.

Seranthony Dominguez had been getting the call in save situations. He’ll get them more now.