A-Rod invests in coconut water brand, but endorses another

11 Comments

Darren Rovell does great work at CNBC covering a range of sports business topics and also runs one of the most interesting Twitter feeds around. He’s been talking for several weeks about a rising product called “coconut water,” which is quickly gaining big-time investors and big-time pitch men from the sports world.

Yankees third baseman Alex Rodriguez is one of those pitch men. And, well, he’s also an investor. Let the conflict begin.

Vita Coco, a brand of coconut water that did $40 million in business last year, announced Wednesday that it had signed Rodriguez to an endorsement deal and even released a picture (seen on the right) with A-Rod holding their product. But Rovell heard Wednesday that the slugger is actually a long-time investor in another coconut water brand called Zico, and that his ad for Vita Coco has now caused confusion within both companies.

A-Rod attempted to bring clarity to the matter in typical clumsy fashion on Wednesday:

“I don’t discuss my personal investments,” Rodriguez told CNBC, in statement read by his business manager, Guy Oseary. “What I will say is that since Zico changed their formula to concentrate, I felt that the taste and functionality was compromised and that’s when I started to only drink Vita Coco. I love the taste and purity of Vita Coco.”

So A-Rod pumped money into a coconut water brand, then decided he liked another coconut water brand better and is now helping to sell product for a competitor. Zico CEO Mark Rampolla told Rovell this week that if Rodriguez “truly feels that he made a better choice, we’ll be more than happy to return his money.”

Kershaw-Sale anything but a pitcher’s duel

Elsa/Getty Images
1 Comment

World Series Game 1 was billed as a battle of aces, the Dodgers’ Clayton Kershaw against Chris Sale of the Red Sox. Between them, they have 14 All-Star Game nominations. Kershaw has won three Cy Young Awards. Sale could his first Cy Young Award this year. Among his 10 seasons with at least 110 innings pitched, Kershaw has never posted a sub-2.92 ERA. Sale has been at 2.90 or below in each of the last two seasons. The two have combined for over 4,000 career strikeouts and both have averaged better than a strikeout per inning over their careers.

And yet Tuesday’s Game 1 was anything but a pitcher’s duel between Kershaw and Sale. Though a couple of fielding mistakes weren’t of any help to Kershaw in the first inning, Red Sox batters were squaring him up good. Of the five balls put in play in the first inning, three had exit velocities of 100 MPH or higher. Of the 12 total balls put in play against him overall, five reached triple digits in exit velo.

Kershaw gave up a pair of runs in the first, another run in the third on a J.D. Martinez double to straightaway center field, and another two in the fifth. Kershaw led off the fifth by walking Mookie Betts, then giving up a single to Andrew Benintendi, ending his night. Ryan Madson relieved Kershaw and proceeded to allow both inherited runners to score. All told, Kershaw yielded five runs on seven hits and three walks with five strikeouts on 79 pitches in four-plus innings.

Sale, meanwhile, was on the hook for individual runs in the second, third, and fifth. Dodger hitters weren’t squaring him up quite as well as the Red Sox batters squared up Kershaw, but Sale was still more hittable than usual. Of the eight balls put in play against him, four were at least 90 MPH in exit velo. One of the runs was a no-doubt solo home run to Matt Kemp in the second. The Dodgers chased Sale in the fifth when he issued a leadoff walk to Brian Dozier. Matt Barnes relieved him allowed the inherited runner to score. Overall, Sale threw 91 pitches in four-plus innings, serving up three runs on five hits and two walks with seven strikeouts.

The game is now, as has been generally the case throughout this postseason, a battle of the bullpens.