Giants ready to admit mistake by releasing Miguel Tejada?

11 Comments

San Francisco signing Miguel Tejada to a one-year, $6.5 million deal and handing him the starting shortstop job at age 37 was a bad idea at the time, as they focused on his veteran-ness rather than his declining offense and lack of range.

By the middle of spring training the beat reporters covering the team were talking openly about how unimpressive Tejada looked, by late April the Giants had switched him from shortstop to third base, and now Andrew Baggarly of the San Jose Mercury News reports that they may be ready to simply release the former MVP.

Pablo Sandoval is close to coming off the disabled list, creating an infield logjam and forcing a roster move, and Baggarly writes that “there doesn’t appear to be much use for Tejada” with rookie Brandon Crawford playing well.

Tejada ranks dead last among NL hitters with a .515 OPS and his defense, even at third base, has been ugly. Asked about his job security, Tejada replied: “There’s four months left. I’m not going to let these first two months get in my head.”

The Yankees and Red Sox will both be wearing home whites for the London Series

Getty Images
8 Comments

This summer’s series between the Yankees and Red Sox in London is, technically, a home series for the Red Sox, with the Yankees serving as the visitors. Pete Abraham reports that Major League Baseball is dispensing with the usual sartorial formalities, however, and will have both teams wearing their home livery: the Red Sox will wear white and the Yankees will wear pinstripes.

It’s marketing more than anything, as you can’t really put your league’s marquee franchise on an international stage and not have it wearing its iconic duds, right?

It’s also pretty harmless if you ask me. Baseball is not like football or basketball in which you have to have contrasting uniforms in order to keep one side from accidentally throwing the ball to the opposition or what have you. And with so many teams wearing solid color alternates now — sometimes both the home and road team are in blue or red jerseys in the same game — it’s not like there hasn’t already been a breakdown in home white/road gray orthodoxy. I prefer the classics, but I lost that battle a long time ago.

So: I say let a thousand colors fly. Heck, let the Yankees wear their pinstripes on the road all the time. Who’ll stop ’em?