The implications of moving the fences in at Citi Field

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Everyone talks about moving the fences in at Citi Field, but no one analyzes it.  That is until today, when Adam Rubin — with the help of Greg Rybarczyk from Hittrackeronline.com — looks into how various modifications to the dimensions of Citi Field would affect the Mets in general and David Wright — the most frequently mentioned victim of Citi Field’s caverns — in particular.

Overall, the affect on Wright would not be as dramatic as one might think if you believe the “Citi Field is killing David Wright” crowd. He probably would have had four more homers in 2009, for example. Of course, one shouldn’t focus too much on Wright anyway. As Rubin notes in the article, Sandy Alderson — who once rejiggered the fences at Petco Park — does not believe that you should build a club to cater to the ballpark. As such, altering a ballpark to cater to one player is likely seen as madness by the Mets’ brass. And I tend to agree.

Ultimately, though, home runs may not be the determining factor. Check out this line from Rybarczyk:

 “It’s probably worth mentioning that the Mets could create some nice new premium seats with these changes. In the Mo’s Zone, you’d get a few more rows of seats right near the field, and in left field you could make a sort of ‘home run porch’ out in front of the existing wall, with open-air seating on top, and another area underneath with a field-level view.”

That, much more than David Wright’s happiness, is likely to get the carpenters moving on fence construction.

Video: Gleyber Torres slugs a home run in his fourth straight game

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Yankees rookie second baseman Gleyber Torres has a fun streak going right now: He’s homered in four straight games, becoming the youngest American League player to do so.

The historic knock arrived in the seventh inning of Friday’s series opener against the Angels. With two outs and the bases empty, Torres pounced on a 1-3 fastball from Jim Johnson and posted it to the right field bleachers for a go-ahead run:

It was just the Yankees’ second run of the night (the first having also been provided by Torres on an RBI single in the second inning), but the only one they needed to maintain an edge over the Angels.

Torres, 21, is off to a torrid start this season. Following Saturday’s 2-1 win, he now carries a .333/.393/.646 batting line, nine home runs and a 1.038 OPS through 106 plate appearances. In the past four games alone, he’s gone 7-for-15 with five homers (including a pair of solo shots, a two-run homer and three-run homer) and nine RBI. He’ll have to collect a home run in his next five games if he wants to set a new all-time record, however: Dale Long (1956 Pirates), Don Mattingly (1987 Yankees), and Ken Griffey Jr. (1993 Mariners) currently share the record for the longest home run-hitting streak, at eight games apiece.