2011 MLB Draft – picks 11-15: Astros grab George Springer at No. 11

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Astros picked Connecticut outfielder George Springer with the 11th selection.

Springer was expected to go right around here after hitting .350/.458/.628 with 12 homers for the Huskies this season, but it’s something of a surprise to see him land with Houston. While he’ll play center initially, he may need to move to an outfield corner in time. He has a lot of power potential, but since he does swing and miss quite a bit, he may struggle to hit for average in the majors.

Brewers selected Texas right-hander Taylor Jungmann 12th overall

Jungmann was a rock-solid pitcher for the Longhorns, going 13-1 with a 1.40 ERA this season, and one of the most polished arms in the draft. His low-90s fastball, curve and changeup all project as major league pitches. He may not be the most exciting selection, but he’s a good value here, and he might be a candidate to join the Milwaukee rotation before the end of next year.

Mets took high school outfielder Brandon Nimmo with the 13th pick.

Some really like Nimmo’s potential. He’s an especially raw talent since his high school in Wyoming didn’t have a baseball team, but his swing promises lots of power and he has plenty of athletic ability. The Mets could have played it safer, but they’ve opted to swing for the fences instead.

Marlins selected high school right-hander Jose Fernandez 14th.

This wasn’t a very tough call: the Marlins love high school pitching and Fernandez, a Cuban defector, was right in their backyard in Florida. Fernandez has hit 98 mph on the radar gun, and his slider could be a plus pitch in time. His changeup needs work, but he was pretty much a lock to go in the middle of the first round.

The Brewers picked Georgia Tech left-hander Jed Bradley 15th overall.

Picking 12th and 15th, the Brewers come away with two of the best college pitchers available. Bradley has four pitches, including a low-90s fastball. At 6’4″, 225 pounds, he also possesses the size that teams like. He was something of a disappointment for Georgia Tech this year, going 7-3 with a 3.49 ERA. Still, he’s a very good value here.

José Ramirez’s 17-pitch at-bat kickstarts Indians’ five-run comeback in ninth inning

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With his team trailing 8-3 to begin the bottom of the ninth inning of Sunday’s game against the Astros, Indians third baseman José Ramirez eventually won a 17-pitch at-bat against closer Ken Giles, ripping a double off of the wall in right field. The Indians would go on to score five runs on seven hits to tie the game against Giles and Hector Rondon. Ramirez almost won the game in his second at-bat of the ninth inning, but first basebamn Yuli Gurriel made a terrific diving catch on a line drive otherwise headed for the right field corner.

Giants first baseman Brandon Belt set a new modern record for the longest at-bat last month, seeing 21 pitches against the Angels’ Jaime Barria. The Astros’ Ricky Gutierrez sfaw 20 pitches from the Indians’ Bartolo Colon on June 26, 1998, which was the previous record. Kevin Bass saw 19 pitches from the Phillies’ Steve Bedrosian in 1988. There have also been five 18-pitch at-bats from Brian Downing, Bip Roberts, Alex Cora, Adam Kennedy, and Marcus Semien.

Sunday’s game wound up going 14 innings. The Astros pulled ahead 9-8 in the top of the 13th on a solo home run from Evan Gattis. However, the Indians’ Yonder Alonso responded with a solo shot of his own in the bottom of the 13th to re-knot the game at 9-9. Greg Allen then lifted a walk-off solo homer in the bottom of the 14th to give the Indians a 10-9 win.

After Sunday’s effort, Ramirez is batting .292/.389/.605 with 15 home runs, 37 RBI, 34 runs scored, and seven stolen bases. According to FanGraphs, his 3.5 Wins Above Replacement ranks third across baseball behind Mike Trout (4.4) and Mookie Betts (4.1). They’re the only players at three wins or above.