David Wright shut down for at least three more weeks

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The Mets just set a major league record by losing their sixth consecutive home game with a lead after seven innings. But somehow that’s not the worst news of the night.

According to Adam Rubin of ESPNNewYork.com, Mets general manager Sandy Alderson announced after the game that David Wright will not begin baseball activities for at least another three weeks.

Wright was scheduled for an X-ray today, but Rubin writes that this new timetable is based off the previous X-ray. Huh? Either way, the stress fracture in his back isn’t progressing as quickly as the Mets originally expected.

With a July-return now looking like the best case scenario, Alderson is at least trying to look on the bright side.

“Maybe we’ll have David back for Santana’s first start.”

If you put that comment through the Mets-translator, we can expect that event to take place sometime during the 2012 season.

Yadier Molina ties record for the most games caught with one team

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Yadier Molina has two World Series rings, multiple Gold Gloves, Platinum Gloves, All-Star appearances and a Silver Slugger award. He now has an all-time record too.

The record: the most games caught with one team. Last night he caught his 1756th career game with the Cardinals, with ties him with Gabby Hartnett of the Cubs, who last caught in 1941 and set the record in 1940, his last season with Chicago. Molina will break the record next time he dons the tools of ignorance, likely tonight against the Phillies.

Given how badly catchers get beaten up — and Molina has taken a beating at times in his career — and given how well mastery of the position leads to a catcher earning journeyman status, as it were, it’s quite a thing to catch that many games for one team.

Given that Molina is under contract with the Cardinals for two more seasons and has stated his desire to retire a Cardinal many times, he’s likely to put that record so far out of reach that it’ll likely take at least another 78 years to break it, if indeed it is ever broken.