Cameron Diaz “hurt and betrayed” after breaking up with Alex Rodriguez

34 Comments

Alex Rodriguez and Cameron Diaz have broken up, reports the New York Daily News.

And to think, they seemed so happy together as she hand-fed him popcorn in a luxury box at the Super Bowl on national television.

According to “a source” quoted in the article Diaz is “hurt and betrayed, because she tried so hard to please him. She went overboard.”

I’m assuming that means too much salt on the popcorn, although I’m not sure what to believe any more when the same article calls her a “starlet” and him a “baseball ace.” Ah yes, if only I had a nickel for every time someone called ARod a “baseball ace.”

Also noted in the article is that since breaking up with his wife the 35-year-old Rodriguez has dated and broken up with Kate Hudson, Madonna, and now Diaz, which is an eclectic mix to say the least. Hudson is 32, Diaz is 38, Madonna is 52, and Madonna’s arms are 107.

Savor every last kernel of popcorn, kids. Life is short.*

* My apologies for this lame attempt at being Perez Hilton, but someone had to do it and Craig is too busy writing about superficial, unimportant stuff like ballpark fires and debt rule violations.

There is a “one million percent” chance Aroldis Champan will opt-out of his deal

Getty Images
Leave a comment

Ken Rosenthal of The Athletic reports that there is a “one million percent” chance Yankees closer Aroldis Chapman will opt out once the season ends.

Just going by the math this makes perfect sense, of course.

Chapman signed a five-year, $86 million deal with the Yankees before the 2017 season. Pursuant to the terms of the deal he’ll make $15 million a year in 2020 and 2021 (he was given an $11 million signing bonus that was finished being paid out last year). This past season the qualifying offer was $17.9 million. Craig Kimbrel of the Cubs just signed a deal that will pay him $16 million in 2020, 2021, and 2022 (he’s making a prorated $16 million this year). Other top closer salaries at the moment include Kenley Jansen ($19,333,334); and Wade Davis ($18 million).

It’s fair to say that Chapman fits into that group and, I think it’s safe to say, more teams would take him than those guys if they were all freely available. As such, Chapman opting out to get more money makes all kinds of sense. Heck, opting out, getting slapped with a qualifying offer, accepting it and then hitting the market unencumbered after the 2020 season would stand him in better financial stead than if he didn’t opt-out in the first place.

The question is whether the Yankees will let it get that far or whether they’ll approach him to renegotiate the final couple of years on the deal or to add some years onto the back of it. If they’re smart they will.