Baseball team needs help? Call Wall Street

5 Comments

In light of hedge fund manager David Einhorn buying into the Mets, The Wall Street Journal makes an observation this morning:

Einhorn is poised to join a growing number of sports team stakeholders who have come to this highly eccentric vocation bearing one basic skill: the ability to manage enormous sums of money. Over the past decade, hedge-fund managers and elite financiers—many of whom are from New York or who made their fortunes here—have emerged as the first people bankers call when they have a major sports franchise to dispose of.

I suppose courting owners whose skill is “manging enormous sums of money” is preferable to baseball’s old m.o. of courting owners whose calling card seems to be a striking inability to manage enormous sums of money. So hey — progress.

Shohei Ohtani no longer facing Masahiro Tanaka on Sunday at Yankee Stadium

Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images
2 Comments

Shohei Ohtani has essentially become the Angels’ designated Sunday starting pitcher, but Angels manager Mike Scioscia announced Thursday morning that the 23-year-old two-way Japanese star will be skipped in the rotation this weekend at Yankee Stadium for “workload management” purposes.

Ohtani is fine to continue hitting, so there’s no sense of any physical ailment.

This decision will rob us — and the Japanese media — of a showdown between Ohtani and countrymate Masahiro Tanaka. And for that we are rather devastated, but you can understand the Angels’ concerns about overuse.

Ohtani has registered a 3.35 ERA, 1.066 WHIP, and 52/14 K/BB ratio through his first 40 1/3 innings (seven starts) as a major league pitcher and he’s slashing .308/.364/.582 with six home runs and 19 RBI in 26 games as a part-time DH.