Scott Cousins feels bad about Buster Posey’s injury

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Scott Cousins — the man who flattened Buster — spoke to the San Francisco Chronicle earlier today. The upshot: he does not regret the play, which he thought was a clean, albeit hard-nosed play.  He does, however, regret that Posey was hurt and, of course, never intended to hurt him:

I committed to it. I went in there hard. My instinct was just to check and make sure everyone was OK. I wanted to be a good sportsman about it. It is part of the game, but it’s a hard-nosed part of the game. You can’t change it, but you certainly don’t want anyone to get hurt. I wanted to knock the ball clean out of his glove, but I certainly didn’t want him to get hurt.”

This of course has led to a lot of “sure, you feel bad, but not as bad as Posey does” talk from both Giants fans and even from Bruce Bochy in an article I saw earlier this afternoon.  Which I suppose is understandable. As the comments in the earlier Posey posts at HBT illustrate, there is a lot of varying sentiment about it. As far as I can tell the consensus is yeah, it was a legal play, and one we see a lot of in baseball, but Cousins attack vector may not have been advisable or necessary.

I still can’t shake one notion, however. The notion that if Cousins had held up short or taken a less-than-aggressive path to the plate and been called out, that a lot of people would be on him today for not going hard and giving that proverbial 110%.

Brewers release Brett Lawrie

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Brett Lawrie has not played in the majors since 2016. Last February, however, he signed a minor league contract with the Brewers in an effort to make a comeback. It seems that comeback has come to an end. At least with Milwaukee, which has released him.

No word on exactly why he was released. It’s likely health-related as he had not appeared in any minor league games. His history of leg problems may very well have been the culprit.

Lawrie played six big league seasons, four of which came in Toronto and one each with the White Sox and the Athletics. In that time he hit .261/.315/.419 with 71 homers in 588 games. While he had his moments he never did live up to the hype generated by his partial 2011 season in which he posted a .953 OPS (153 OPS+) in 43 games.

If his career is to continue, it’ll be with another organization.