We know McCourt and Wilpon are awful, but where does your team’s owner rank?

17 Comments

Over at ESPN.com, Jim Caple decided to rank Major League Baseball’s owners from 1-30 with a little explanatory blurb.  You won’t be shocked to find Frank McCourt at the bottom and Fred Wilpon in the 29th position.

But what about the others? And for that matter, what makes an owner good anyway?  Is it just winning? If so, why are the Steinbrenners fourth?  Is it about making commitments to star players and exciting the fan base? If so, why are the Rockies’ owners so far down the list?

Personally I think Caple reveals a fairly coherent and at least defensible system by the time he’s all said and done, but there is clearly a lot of subjectivity to it all, as any list ranking this kind of thing must have.

And of course there is nothing more subjective than a fan’s feeling about his or her own team’s owners.  For instance, here’s Caple’s blub on the Braves:

13. Liberty Media, Atlanta: CEO Terry McGuirk isn’t exactly Ted Turner. Not that there is anything wrong with that at all.

Says you, Jim.  Ted may be unhinged, but dad gummit, the Braves won a World Series when he was in the owner’s box. And broadcast their games all over the damn country, growing the fan base.  Even when they lost, the product was a lot of fun, both for intentional and unintentional reasons.  I’m assuming that, these days, Turner is walking around the half of Montana that he owns, thinking up crazy schemes that will never see the light of day, but I’d give my right arm for him to be running the Bravos at the moment.

See how that works?

Zac Rosscup throws immaculate inning, lands on DL

Abbie Parr/Getty Images
1 Comment

A day after throwing an immaculate inning — getting through an inning on three consecutive strikeouts with nine pitches — against the Mariners, Dodgers reliever Zac Rosscup was placed on the 10-day disabled list with a left calf strain. The move made room on the 25-man roster for Kenley Jansen, who is back after missing some time due to an irregular heartbeat.

Rosscup pitched the ninth inning of Sunday’s 12-1 win over the Mariners. He struck out Kyle Seager, Ryon Healy, and Cameron Maybin on three pitches each. Rosscup is the fourth pitcher to throw an immaculate inning this season, joining Kevin Gausman, Max Scherzer, and German Marquez. 2018’s four immaculate innings is still far behind 2017’s record of eight.

Rosscup has pitched only 6 2/3 innings in the majors this year. He has yielded five runs (all earned) on seven hits and a walk with 10 strikeouts. He missed a significant amount of time earlier this season due to a blister on his left middle finger.