We know McCourt and Wilpon are awful, but where does your team’s owner rank?

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Over at ESPN.com, Jim Caple decided to rank Major League Baseball’s owners from 1-30 with a little explanatory blurb.  You won’t be shocked to find Frank McCourt at the bottom and Fred Wilpon in the 29th position.

But what about the others? And for that matter, what makes an owner good anyway?  Is it just winning? If so, why are the Steinbrenners fourth?  Is it about making commitments to star players and exciting the fan base? If so, why are the Rockies’ owners so far down the list?

Personally I think Caple reveals a fairly coherent and at least defensible system by the time he’s all said and done, but there is clearly a lot of subjectivity to it all, as any list ranking this kind of thing must have.

And of course there is nothing more subjective than a fan’s feeling about his or her own team’s owners.  For instance, here’s Caple’s blub on the Braves:

13. Liberty Media, Atlanta: CEO Terry McGuirk isn’t exactly Ted Turner. Not that there is anything wrong with that at all.

Says you, Jim.  Ted may be unhinged, but dad gummit, the Braves won a World Series when he was in the owner’s box. And broadcast their games all over the damn country, growing the fan base.  Even when they lost, the product was a lot of fun, both for intentional and unintentional reasons.  I’m assuming that, these days, Turner is walking around the half of Montana that he owns, thinking up crazy schemes that will never see the light of day, but I’d give my right arm for him to be running the Bravos at the moment.

See how that works?

Padres may have more interest in Dallas Keuchel than Bryce Harper

Dallas Keuchel
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An interesting tidbit today from The Athletic’s Ken Rosenthal, who noted that ongoing talks between agent Scott Boras and the Padres have focused more on starting pitcher Dallas Keuchel than slugger Bryce Harper. Earlier this week, there were conflicting reports on the Padres’ level of interest in Harper — MLB Network’s Jon Heyman heard the club had not ruled out another big signing after getting Manny Machado, while Kevin Acee of the San Diego Union-Tribune talked to multiple sources who believed otherwise — but any agreement between the two is looking unlikelier by the day.

As for Keuchel, Rosenthal cautions that a potential deal is still a “longshot,” especially as the team has other, cheaper options in mind. The 31-year-old southpaw turned down a qualifying offer from the Astros last year and is likely angling for something north of the five-year, $90 million contract extension he rejected from the club in 2016. He’s coming off of another solid performance in Houston, where he went 12-11 in 34 starts with a 3.74 ERA, 2.6 BB/9, 6.7 SO/9, and 3.6 fWAR through 204 2/3 innings in 2018.

While Keuchel has failed to garner substantial interest around the league this offseason, Heyman points out that the Phillies are looking to establish themselves as frontrunners for the lefty — and they’re far less likely to have hang-ups about his asking price, too.