The knives are out for Bob Geren

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I don’t think anyone disagrees that Brian Fuentes was wrong to spout off about Bob Geren to the media the other night. Even Fuentes agrees, saying in his apology yesterday that he still believed everything he said about Geren’s lack of communication skills, but that he merely shouldn’t have shared it publicly like he did.

Sharing his distaste for Geren publicly today is former A’s pitcher Huston Street, who had many of the same complaints that Fuentes had. Only he, in a text sent to Chronicle reporter Susan Slusser, was a lot more expansive when it came to his feelings about his former manager:

“Bob was never good at communication, and I don’t want to speak for anybody else, but it was a sentiment reflected in many conversations during the two years I spent in Oakland, and even recently when talking to guys after I left. For me personally, he was my least favorite person I have ever encountered in sports from age 6 to 27. I am very thankful to be in a place where I can trust my manager.”

The Chronicle’s John Shea goes on to remind us of a blowup Street had with Geren on a road trip in 2008 and how, on that same trip, Mike Sweeney went after Geren too due to what he felt was, again, a lack of communication and ultimately poor treatment. This being the same Mike Sweeney whose primary mode of expressing himself is via hugs.

There are a couple of players quoted who, while not giving Geren a ringing endorsement, don’t slam him either. But yeah, it does seem like one of those situations that is gonna snowball. There aren’t many “the manager is losing his team” stories that end well for that manager. And that’s true whether the manager is best buddies with the GM or not.

Video: J.D. Martinez hits league-tying 23rd home run

Seattle Mariners v Boston Red Sox
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The Red Sox and Mariners left nothing on the table Friday night, going head-to-head in a series opener that eventually ended 14-10 in the Sox’ favor. Led by Steven Wright and Wade LeBlanc — neither of whom made it past the fifth inning — the teams combined for 34 hits and four home runs, including two moonshots from Seattle’s Nelson Cruz and a five-run rally that gave Boston the edge in the seventh.

In the sixth inning, however, the Red Sox were still scrambling to make up a four-run deficit. Left fielder J.D. Martinez cut it in half with one swing, pouncing on an 89.5-mph fastball from Seattle right-hander Nick Vincent and posting it to dead center field for a two-run shot.

The 427-foot blast was Martinez’s 23rd of the season, tying Mike Trout for the most home runs in the league this year. While he still has a ways to go before eclipsing the career-best 45-HR mark he set in 2017, he’s off to a strong start this season: Entering Friday’s game, the 30-year-old slugger was batting .315/.386/.623 with a 1.009 OPS and AL-leading 55 RBI in 308 PA. He finished Friday’s game 4-for-5 with five RBI, just one triple shy of hitting for the cycle.

Heading into the All-Star Break, both Martinez and Trout still have some competition for the home run title. Jose Ramirez is sitting at 22 homers, while Nelson Cruz and Khris Davis are tied at 20 apiece.