Alcohol-fueled incidents at the ballpark: is it any worse than it has always been?

46 Comments

There’s an AP story today about alcohol at ballparks leading to increased violence, drunkenness, drunk driving and otherwise boorish behavior, pegged to a study by the University of Minnesota. The results are, um, sobering:

  • Alcohol laws and guidelines at stadiums are poorly enforced, with research subjects pretending to be drunk being served 74 percent of the time;
  • Eight percent of people leaving ballparks who submitted to Breathalyzer tests were found to be drunk and 40 percent were found to have had some alcohol;
  • Lots of anecdotal evidence regarding bad, alcohol-fueled behavior and police activity necessitated by fights and stuff.

None of this is good of course, and it would be naive to think that there isn’t an increased amount of drinking at sporting events and increased problems as a result of that drinking compared to normal, day-to-day life.

But I also find these results (or at least the story reporting the results) to be of limited value, mostly because it doesn’t — and likely can’t, in all fairness — compare the state of drinking at the ballpark today to what it was 15 or 20 years ago or more. I think this is critical, because while this study presents anecdotal evidence of a problem today, the anecdotal evidence of yesterday is far more damning.

In his New Historical Baseball Abstract, Bill James wrote about his experience attending games.  He writes:

“Between 1977 and 1983, I never went to a major league game at which I was not seated near to a loud, obnoxious drunk.  I went to very few games in that era at which there was not a fight that broke out somewhere in the vicinity of my seat … there were frequent incidents of fans throwing things at players, pouring beer on players. Drunken fans would run out onto the field. Sometimes there would be a group of rowdy patrons — for our five guys together, maybe eight, maybe twenty, all drinking and screaming obscenities at the players or trying to pick fights with other fans.

His description went on and on like that, and ended with the observation that between that time and the book’s publication — 2002 — this kind of behavior was largely eliminated from ballparks.  How?  By all kinds of things ranging from checking IDs to making sure fans didn’t bring in their own bottles to a more proactive policing of the stands by ushers.  All of these things — and many more — are still in place at ballparks today.

So I guess what I’d like to know is the stuff being described in the AP article and the study evidence that we are in a backslide to the bad old days James describes, or is it really a situation in which things have gotten way, way better over time, but they were so bad to begin with that alcohol at the ballpark remains a problem.

If it’s the former, baseball probably needs to do something. If it’s the latter, well, we may be simply dealing with human nature and the limitations of anyone to control that when you throw 30,000 people together in one place and sell them beer.

José Abreu hospitalized due to thigh infection

Jon Durr/Getty Images
Leave a comment

The Athletic’s James Fegan reports that White Sox first baseman José Abreu has been hospitalized due to an infection in his thigh. It is apparently unrelated for the emergency surgery Abreu underwent last month for testicular torsion. The White Sox expect Abreu to miss the entirety of the three-game series against the Indians, which begins tonight, but are calling him day-to-day.

Abreu, 31, missed three weeks between August 20 and September 10 due to testicular torsion. After going 3-for-4 in his first game back from the disabled list, Abreu went hitless over his next five games spanning 23 trips to the plate. That dropped his triple-slash line down to .265/.325/.473 with 22 home runs and 78 RBI in 553 plate appearances.

Abreu had hit at least 25 home runs and knocked in at least 100 runs in each of his first four seasons in the majors, but he will almost certainly not reach triple-digits in RBI this season. His hospital visits impacted that, unfortunately. Abreu will enter his third and final year of arbitration eligibility after the season.