UPDATE: Pedro Alvarez placed on disabled list with quad injury

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UPDATE: Pedro Alvarez was indeed placed on the 15-day disabled list, reports Colin Dunlap of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.

1:15 PM: According to Colin Dunlap of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, the Pirates have dispatched minor league infielder Pedro Ciriaco to Pittsburgh for tonight’s game against the Tigers. The Pirates have yet to announce an official roster move, but Dunlap speculates that Ciriaco could take the place of Pedro Alvarez on the active roster.

Alvarez missed last night’s game with tightness in his right quadriceps, the very same injury that sidelined him for four games earlier this month.

While Alvarez showed plenty of promise last season by batting .256/.326/.451 with 16 homers and 64 RBI over his first 386 major league plate appearances, he’s been a major disappointment so far in 2011. The 24-year-old is currently batting just .202 with two homers, 10 RBI and 42 strikeouts over his first 125 at-bats while his seven errors are tied with Mark Reynolds for the most among major league third basemen.

Minor League Baseball eclipses 40 million in attendance for 14th consecutive season

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Minor League Baseball announced on Wednesday that, for the 14th consecutive season, the league has eclipsed 40 million in total attendance. 20 teams set single-game attendance records and seven teams set franchise records for single-game attendance in their current parks.

ESPN’s Keith Law, who has been covering the minor leagues for quite a while, did the math:

Minor League Baseball president and CEO Pat O’Conner, whose most prominent stint in the public eye involved him disingenuously justifying the underpaying of his players, said, “Minor League Baseball continues to be the best entertainment value in sports, and these numbers support that. For us to top 40 million fans for the 14th consecutive season despite the weather challenges our teams faced in April and May is a testament to the continued support of our loyal fan bases and the creative promotions and hard work done by all of our teams across the country.”

Major and Minor League Baseball are quite happy to make money hand over fist on the backs of their players, but are too cheap to pay them adequately for their labor.