Say what you want about interleague play, but the Cubs vs. the Red Sox is pretty cool

31 Comments

I’ve said enough about the blahness of interleague play. Let’s be done with that. Because, as Tiffany noted at the end of the video, there are some redeeming matchups that generate some actual organic fan interest, and the top of that list this season is the Red Sox vs. the Cubs.

These two storied franchises square off for three in Fenway Park this weekend and, as Anthony Castrovince of MLB.com notes in an excellent column today, it’s a very different world now than it was in 1918, which was the last time they met.  Oh, and Castrovince gets bonus points for being the first baseball writer I can recall ever dropping a reference to the Zimmerman Telegram. Totally underrated episode in world history and, if it hasn’t been used for this end a hundred times already, would be the great launching point for a good alternate history yarn.

But of course 1918 was a long time ago. The Cubs were not too far removed from an actual world championship, both them and the Red Sox were playing in shiny new ballparks that I’m sure the old timers called “gimmicky,” and Tim Wakefield was but a child.  Today the stakes of a Red Sox-Cubs matchup are far lower than they were the last time they met.

On the line for Boston: a six-game winning streak that has allowed them to pull a game and a half of the Rays.  The Cubs are only 19-23, but they just took two from a good Marlins team and a nice weekend — and a couple of breaks in the Reds and Cardinals respective series — can put them back in the thick of things in the NL Central.

So we have history. And we have novelty. And we have meaningful baseball.  I’ll gladly set aside my interleague ennui on account of that.

21-year-old Gleyber Torres homers twice off of 44-year-old Bartolo Colon

Elsa/Getty Images
1 Comment

Yankees second baseman Gleyber Torres was born on December 13, 1996. That year, Bartolo Colon (who turns 45 years old on Thursday) was wrapping up a season he spent with Double-A Canton-Akron and Triple-A Buffalo. He would debut in the majors the following April.

In a clash of generations, the 21-year-old Torres and Colon squared off on Monday as the Yankees visited the Rangers. Torres won the battle twice, drilling a two-run home run off of Colon in the second inning and a solo shot off of Colon in the fourth. Colon wound up giving up six runs in total on eight hits (including four homers) and a walk with four strikeouts in 5 1/3 innings.

Here is video of the first homer Torres hit:

Torres is the second-youngest Yankee in club history with a multi-homer game. Mickey Mantle was 20 years and 296 days old when he went yard twice on August 11, 1952. Torres is 21 years, 159 days old. Joe DiMaggio was 21-212 when he hit two on June 24, 1936.

So much for respecting one’s elders. We’re currently seeing a youth movement in baseball. 19-year-old Juan Soto hit his first major league homer on Monday against the Padres. 20-year-olds Ronald Acuña and Mike Soroka debuted for the Braves earlier this year. Could 19-year-old Blue Jays prospect Vladimir Guerrero, Jr. join them soon?