And That Happened: Tuesday’s scores and highlights

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Yankees 6, Rays 2: Wait, I thought the Yankees’ season was over and everything was doomed, so how does this happen? Two homers for A-Rod, and a two-for-three night for Jorge Posada, who will probably now stick in the seventh spot in the order for a while because, hey, no drama. But since apocalypses apparently aren’t proceeding as planned, I suppose I can make reservations for dinner Saturday night without worrying about anything crazy happening.

Cardinals 2, Phillies 1: Danys Baez loaded the bases in the bottom of the ninth of a 1-1 game and was yanked for J.C. Romero who promptly gave up a walkoff RBI single to Lance Berkman. Fact is, though, that Charlie Manuel has nothing to work with in those situations. There’s no one there, short of using Halladay out of the pen, who you can really count on to get strikeouts in those kinds of situations. And of course, the fact that the Phillies are in those situations have an awful lot to do with the fact that their offense is in a coma, but that’s well-covered territory by now.

Braves 3, Astros 1: Hit it up yesterday. And I can’t wait to see if it’s Yadier Molina, Buster Posey or Geovany Soto who gets more votes for the All-Star Game than Brian McCann. The Brian McCann whose feats yesterday put him in pretty rare company.

Rockies 5, Giants 3: The AP game story calls the Rockies’ three best players the “Big Os — Ubaldo, CarGo and Tulo.”  We really doin’ that?  Anyway, those three all came up big and put the Rockies back on top in the NL West by a half game.

Reds 7, Cubs 5: All of the Reds runs were unearned. And you think Mike Quade was mad after Monday’s game? Here was his quote after this one: “If we haven’t hit rock bottom, we’re pretty damn close.”

White Sox 4, Rangers 3: Texas blew a 3-0 lead and then the winning run scored on a wild pitch.

Indians 7, Royals 3: Well, I guess compared to Monday night this was an improvement, but still, the second-to-worst pitching staff in the AL is not doing anything to stop the best offense in the AL.  Not that this should be a terrible surprise.

Dodgers 3, Brewers 0: Matt Kemp hit a two-run homer in the first and the rest of the game was mere detail.

Diamondbacks 6, Padres 1: “[Eric] Patterson was called out on appeal by third-base umpire Joe West for leaving the bag early, though replays appeared to show Patterson on the base when Upton caught the ball.”  Joe West screwed up a call? Now I’ve seen everything.

Atheltics 14, Angels 0: There was a brief time a couple of years ago in which I kept writing Gio Gonzalez’ name when I was referring to Vin Mazzaro and vice-versa.  I guess confusing that now would be rather silly. Gonzalez shut out the Angels on one hit over seven and the offense asploded. Four RBI for Mark Ellis.

Twins 2, Mariners 1: Francisco Liriano pitches his second best game of the year (7 IP, 3 H, 1 ER, 9K), out dueling Felix Hernandez who had another one of his had-to-be-perfect-but-wasn’t losses.

Marlins vs. Mets; Orioles vs. Red Sox; Pirates vs. Nationals, Blue Jays vs. Tigers: POSTPONED: I’m a-goin’ back out ’fore the rain starts a-fallin’. I’ll walk to the depths of the deepest black forest. Where the people are many and their hands are all empty. Where the pellets of poison are flooding their waters. Where the home in the valley meets the damp dirty prison. Where the executioner’s face is always well hidden. Where hunger is ugly, where souls are forgotten. Where black is the color, where none is the number. And I’ll tell it and think it and speak it and breathe it. And reflect it from the mountain so all souls can see it. Then I’ll stand on the ocean until I start sinkin’. But I’ll know my song well before I start singin’. And it’s a hard, it’s a hard, it’s a hard, it’s a hard … It’s a hard rain’s a-gonna fall.

Casey Kelly signs with the LG Twins in Korea

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We wrote a lot about Casey Kelly on this site circa 2010-12.

It was understandable. Kelly was a big-time draftee for the Red Sox and famously split time as a shortstop and a pitcher in the minors, with some people even wondering if he could do it full time. The Sox put the kibosh on that pretty quickly, as he became the top overall prospect in the Boston organization as a pitcher. He then made news when he was sent to San Diego — along with Anthony Rizzo — in the famous Adrian Gonzalez trade in December 2010.

He made his big league debut for the Padres in late August of 2012, holding a pretty darn good Atlanta Braves team scoreless for six innings, striking out four.  He would pitch in five more games in the season’s final month to not very good results but missed all of 2013 and most of 2014 thanks to Tommy John surgery.

He wouldn’t make it back to the bigs until 2015 — pitching only three games after being converted to a reliever — before the Padres cut him loose, trading him to the Braves for Christian Bethancourt who, like a younger Kelly, the Padres thought could be a two-way player, catching and relieving. That didn’t work for him either, but I digress.

Kelly made a career-high ten appearances for a bad Braves team in 2016, was let go following the season and was out of the majors again in 2017 after the Cubs released him a couple of months after he failed to make the team out of spring training. He resurfaced with the Giants this past season for seven appearances. The Giants cut him loose last month.

Now Kelly’s journey takes him across the ocean. He announced on Instagram last night that he’s signed with the LG Twins in the Korean Baseball Organization. He seems pretty happy and eager about it in his little video there. I don’t blame him, as he’ll make $1 million for them, as opposed to staying here and almost certainly winding up in a Triple-A rotation making $60K or whatever it is veteran minor leaguers make.

This was probably way too many words to devote to a journeyman heading to play in Korea, but we so often forget top prospects once they fail to meet expectations. We also tend to forget all of the Tommy John casualties, focusing instead on the Tommy John successes. As such, I wanted to think a bit about Casey Kelly. I hope things work out well for him in the KBO and a baseball player who once seemed so promising can, after a delay, find success of his own.