Willy Aybar was imprisoned for beating his wife back in January

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This morning I made a joke about Willy Aybar signing with Edmonton in the independent leagues, saying that he was being sent to baseball Siberia. Well, if this report is true, baseball Siberia is way too good for him.  Real Siberia is too good for him.  Frankly, he can take a flying leap into the abyss for all I care:

Yesterday Willy Aybar signed with the Edmonton Capitals of the Independent North American League. We had been wondering why no Major League team would even give Aybar a minor league deal. Turns out it was because Aybar was sentenced to three months in prison in the Dominican Republic after he beat his wife. Aybar’s wife ended up in intensive care for an extended period of time, in critical condition.

That comes from Rays Index, which has a translation of a Dominican Republic news report from back in January. Rays Index infers from the article that Aybar just signed because he was only released from jail a few weeks ago and speculates that he was signed in Canada because he may have had trouble getting a visa to come to the United States given his record.

I don’t know how any of that works. All I know for sure is that I hope to never see Willie Aybar in the major leagues again.

Minor League Baseball eclipses 40 million in attendance for 14th consecutive season

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Minor League Baseball announced on Wednesday that, for the 14th consecutive season, the league has eclipsed 40 million in total attendance. 20 teams set single-game attendance records and seven teams set franchise records for single-game attendance in their current parks.

ESPN’s Keith Law, who has been covering the minor leagues for quite a while, did the math:

Minor League Baseball president and CEO Pat O’Conner, whose most prominent stint in the public eye involved him disingenuously justifying the underpaying of his players, said, “Minor League Baseball continues to be the best entertainment value in sports, and these numbers support that. For us to top 40 million fans for the 14th consecutive season despite the weather challenges our teams faced in April and May is a testament to the continued support of our loyal fan bases and the creative promotions and hard work done by all of our teams across the country.”

Major and Minor League Baseball are quite happy to make money hand over fist on the backs of their players, but are too cheap to pay them adequately for their labor.