Some more details on the Steinbrenner stuff

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Yesterday there were two reports spinning out of FOIA requests related to George Steinbrenner. One dealing with his criminal conviction for campaign finance law violations and one related to his pardon request, which was supported by multiple instances of Steinbrenner assisting the FBI.

Today the New York Times has more details about those things, including the assertions by Steinbrenner’s lawyer at the time — corroborated, it seems, by the FBI — that Steinbrenner put himself at some degree of risk in helping the FBI. The upshot: the cases involved terrorism and organized crime and there was some concern that there could be retaliation against Steinbrenner’s family if things went sideways.

Maybe this was overstated. After all, a lot of these documents appear to be from Steinbrenner’s lawyer in the course of advocating for a pardon for his client, so they’re going to naturally make things seem a bit more dire than they really were. But think how history could have changed if someone did go after The Boss’ family and, say, took out Hal instead of Hank, leaving the latter to run the Yankees by himself.  I shudder at the very prospect.

In other news, the article in the New York Times is accompanied by the below picture, which is pure money, made all the more money because it was taken at Billy Martin’s funeral. If they could have somehow gotten Martin in there — or if they could have panned the crowd for some other rake or scoundrel — it could be the Mount Rushmore of vice:

(Associated Press)

Rakuten Golden Eagles sign Jabari Blash

Jabari Blash
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Former Angels outfielder Jabari Blash has signed a one-year deal with the Tohoku Rakuten Golden Eagles of Nippon Professional Baseball, the team announced Friday. Per the Japan Times, the deal is said to be worth around $1.06 million. Blash was released from his contract with the Angels at the end of November.

The 29-year-old outfielder has had a rough go of it in the majors, where he failed to duplicate the promising results he delivered in the minors. While he consistently batted above .250 with 20-30 home runs per season at the Double- and Triple-A level, he petered out in back-to-back gigs with the Padres and Angels and slumped toward a .103/.200/.128 finish across 45 PA for Anaheim in 2018.

The hope, of course, is that the environment in NPB will help him get a better handle on his issues at the plate — in a best case scenario, resulting in a full-scale transformation that could make him more marketable to MLB teams in the future. To that end, Blash expects to be utilized as a cleanup batter in the Eagles’ lineup and will focus on assisting the club as they make a run toward the Japan Series.