Chris Carpenter, John Danks among winless starters

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11 pitchers had made at least five starts this year and are still looking for their first victories.  Here’s the list:

Jeff Francis (Royals) – 0-4, 5.09 ERA in eight starts
Tim Stauffer (Padres) – 0-1, 2.61 ERA in seven starts
John Danks (White Sox) – 0-5, 3.83 ERA in seven starts
Chris Carpenter (Cardinals) – 0-2, 4.19 ERA in seven starts
Madison Bumgarner (Giants) – 0-5, 4.21 ERA in seven starts
Jo-Jo Reyes (Blue Jays) – 0-3, 5.00 ERA in seven starts
Joe Saunders (Diamondbacks) – 0-4, 5.72 ERA in seven starts
Brad Bergesen (Orioles) – 0-4, 5.57 ERA in six starts (one relief)
Mat Latos (Padres) – 0-4, 4.55 ERA in five starts
Ubaldo Jimenez (Rockies) – 0-2, 5.88 ERA in five starts
Nelson Figueroa (Astros) – 0-3, 9.00 ERA in five starts (two relief)

As the Toronto Globe & Mail points out, Reyes has gone 25 starts without a win since 2008. He’s 5-18 lifetime in 44 starts and four relief appearances.

Stauffer is the most unfortunate guy here. He was finally in line for his first win Friday after pitching 6 2/3 scoreless innings and leaving with a 3-0 lead, but Heath Bell, with a lot of help from an ugly Chase Headley error, blew a save for the first time in 42 opportunities. He’s allowed two runs or fewer in six of his seven starts.

Carpenter also deserves special mention for going winless for a first place team. The former 21-game winner has pitched just well enough to lose. His two best starts this season came in games where St. Louis managed just one run, and his two worst coincided with the Cardinals’ two offensive outbursts (an 8-7 loss to the Marlins on May 4 and a 13-8 loss to the Diamondbacks on April 12).

Marlins unveil what they’re putting in the space where the home run sculpture used to be

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Not long after the new ownership group bought the Miami Marlins, face of the franchise Derek Jeter made it clear that he wanted the home runs sculpture beyond the outfield fence gone. In October they announced that it would, in fact, be moving out to a plaza or the parking lot or someplace you’re unlikely to ever see it because who goes to Marlins games?

Today we got a tease of what the Marlins are doing with the space the sculpture is vacating:

It was only a matter of time before that green wall went away. There are a lot of things I like about the overall aesthetic of Marlins Park, but almost all of them are because of their novelty. Jeff Loria was bad for a lot of reasons, but one of the few good things he did was eschew nostalgia and traditionalism with the ballpark. Nostalgia and traditionalism, unfortunately, is the straw that stirs baseball’s drink, so any “weird” colors or flourishes were gonna be beat out of that place as the years went on. It was inevitable.

As for the “three-tier social space,” here’s hoping that tickets for it are cheap or the Marlins start winning ballgames soon, because the Marlins can’t really fill their existing spectator spaces now.