The National League’s worst by position

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Same rules as yesterday’s American League list.

I’m listing the player most responsible for the position’s poor OPS along with the team.

Rockies 3B – 405 (Jose Lopez)
Padres 1B – 478 (Brad Hawpe)
Dodgers 1B – 508 (James Loney)
Pirates SS – 515 (Ronny Cedeno)
Marlins SS – 541 (Hanley Ramirez)
Padres SS – 550 (Jason Bartlett)
Nationals CF – 551 (Rick Ankiel)
Dodgers LF – 568 (Tony Gwynn Jr.)
Astros 2B – 571 (Bill Hall)
Phillies 2B – 573 (Wilson Valdez)
Mets CF – 580 (Angel Pagan)
Marlins 2B – 584 (Omar Infante)
Pirates 3B – 584 (Pedro Alvarez)
Giants 1B – 585 (Aubrey Huff)
Reds 3B – 594 (Scott Rolen)
Dodgers SS – 596 (Jamey Carroll)
Nationals 1B – 597 (Adam LaRoche)
Brewers 3B – 597 (Casey McGehee)
Brewers CF – 598 (Carlos Gomez)
Mets 2B – 603 (Brad Emaus)
D-backs 2B – 613 (Kelly Johnson)
Phillies C – 614 (Carlos Ruiz)
Pirates 1B – 615 (Lyle Overbay)
Brewers RF – 617 (Mark Kotsay)
Phillies LF – 628 (Raul Ibanez)
Padres RF – 633 (Will Venable)
Nationals SS – 636 (Ian Desmond)
Cubs 1B – 636 (Carlos Pena)
Giants SS – 644 (Miguel Tejada)
Dodgers C – 646 (Rod Barajas)
Brewers SS – 646 (Yuniesky Betancourt)

– Astros pitchers currently top all of the above positions with a 650 OPS.

– No Braves or Cardinals on the list.

– The Brewers are the extreme all-or-nothing team here. They’re getting a 1054 OPS from left field, a 967 OPS from first base and a 922 OPS from second base. Their next best is a 652 OPS from catcher.

– It’s pretty incredible to see six first base situations on the list and only two catchers. So far this season, NL catchers have a 747 OPS, while first basemen are at 748. Last year, NL catchers came in at 713, compared to 813 for first basemen. In 2009, it was 710 for catchers and 859 for first basemen.

In the American League this year, catchers are at 671, while first basemen are at 802.

MLB crowds jump from ’21, still below pre-pandemic levels

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PHOENIX — Even with the homer heroics of sluggers like Aaron Judge and Albert Pujols, Major League Baseball wasn’t able to coax fans to ballparks at pre-pandemic levels this season, though attendance did jump substantially from the COVID-19 affected campaign in 2021.

The 30 MLB teams drew nearly 64.6 million fans for the regular season that ended Wednesday, which is up from the 45.3 million who attended games in 2021, according to baseball-reference.com. This year’s numbers are still down from the 68.5 million who attended games in 2019, which was the last season that wasn’t affected by the pandemic.

The 111-win Los Angeles Dodgers led baseball with 3.86 million fans flocking to Dodger Stadium for an average of 47,672 per contest. The Oakland Athletics – who lost 102 games, play in an aging stadium and are the constant subject of relocation rumors – finished last, drawing just 787,902 fans for an average of less than 10,000 per game.

The St. Louis Cardinals finished second, drawing 3.32 million fans. They were followed by the Yankees (3.14 million), defending World Series champion Braves (3.13 million) and Padres (2.99 million).

The Toronto Blue Jays saw the biggest jump in attendance, rising from 805,901 fans to about 2.65 million. They were followed by the Cardinals, Yankees, Mariners, Dodgers, and Mets, which all drew more than a million fans more than in 2021.

The Rangers and Reds were the only teams to draw fewer fans than in 2021.

Only the Rangers started the 2021 season at full capacity and all 30 teams weren’t at 100% until July. No fans were allowed to attend regular season games in 2020.

MLB attendance had been declining slowly for years – even before the pandemic – after hitting its high mark of 79.4 million in 2007. This year’s 64.6 million fans is the fewest in a non-COVID-19 season since the sport expanded to 30 teams in 1998.

The lost attendance has been balanced in some ways by higher viewership on the sport’s MLB.TV streaming service. Viewers watched 11.5 billion minutes of content in 2022, which was a record high and up nearly 10% from 2021.