Sure enough, he’s hurt: Jonathan Broxton shut down with elbow pain

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UPDATE: Just as we suspected, the Dodgers announced that Broxton has been shut down with elbow pain. Not that an elbow injury qualifies as good news, but at least it potentially explains his struggles beyond “Broxton just stinks now.”

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Jonathan Broxton’s latest ugly outing last night has Jon Weisman of Dodger Thoughts wondering if the closer is pitching through an injury.

Broxton was used in a non-save situation, coming into a 1-1 game in the ninth inning, but followed an Aramis Ramirez pop out with back-to-back walks and was quickly yanked.

Weisman notes that Broxton’s fastball topped out at 93 miles per hour and averaged just 91 mph, which is well off from his usual overpowering velocity. Here’s more:

That’s just not the Broxton of 12 months ago, and I’m not convinced it’s even the Broxton of 12 weeks ago. People have been strangely fascinated with Broxton’s facial expressions and posture, but here’s a suggestion: Someone needs to look at his arm. Even if they’ve looked at it before, look at it again. …

Though I’ve always suspected Broxton’s been off physically since his serious struggles began in late June, this was possibly the first time I watched him and said to myself, “There’s a guy that’s headed straight for the disabled list.” Of course, what I observe from my seat far from the pitcher’s mound has no real relevance, but I just offer it as an impression.

It is, I will say, a little peculiar to me that it doesn’t occur to the people who are calling for Broxton’s head and questioning his mental makeup that Broxton is possibly pitching hurt, and maybe has been for some time. If he has been concealing an injury, I sure hope he comes clean.

Whenever a formerly dominant pitcher has a sudden, sustained drop in performance the initial reaction should definitely skew more toward “maybe he’s hurt” than “maybe he’s a bum now.” Yet as Weisman said above, for some reason that rarely happens.

Broxton was an elite, dominating reliever for four-and-a-half seasons, but he’s been a mess since a four-run appearance on June 27 of last year. He actually took a 0.83 ERA into that game, but since then Broxton has thrown 42 innings with a 7.02 ERA and 35/32 K/BB ratio.

Colin Poche, Rays go to arbitration just $125,000 apart

Colin Poche torn UCL
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ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. – Reliever Colin Poche went to salary arbitration with the Tampa Bay Rays on Tuesday with the sides just $125,000 apart.

The gap between the $1.3 million the pitcher asked for and the $1,175,000 the team offered was the smallest among the 33 players who exchanged proposed arbitration figures last month. The case was heard by John Woods, Jeanne Vonhof and Walt De Treux, who will hold their decision until later this month.

A 29-year-old left-hander, Poche had Tommy John surgery on July 29, 2020, and returned to the major leagues last April 22 after six appearances at Triple-A Durham. Poche was 4-2 with a 3.99 ERA and seven saves in 65 relief appearances for the Rays. He struck out 64 and walked 22 in 58 2/3 innings.

Poche had a $707,800 salary last year.

Tampa Bay went to arbitration on Monday with reliever Ryan Thompson, whose decision also is being held until later this month. He asked for $1.2 million and the Rays argued for $1 million.

Rays right-hander Jason Adam and outfielder Harold Ramirez remain scheduled for hearings.

Players and teams have split four decisions thus far. All-Star pitcher Max Fried ($13.5 million) lost to Atlanta and reliever Diego Castillo ($2.95 million) was defeated by Seattle, while pitcher Jesus Luzardo ($2.45 million) and AL batting champion Luis Arraez ($6.1 million) both beat the Marlins.

A decision also is pending for Los Angeles Angels outfielder Hunter Renfroe.

Eighteen additional players are eligible for arbitration and hearings are scheduled through Feb. 17. Among the eligible players is Seattle utilityman Dylan Moore, who has a pending three-year contract worth $8,875,000.