Mets give away 4,000 tickets to military members and their families for Tuesday’s game at Citi Field

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The Mets announced earlier this evening that they have donated 4,000 tickets to military members and their families for tomorrow night’s series opener against the Giants at Citi Field.

This gesture is in addition to the Mets’ current policy that allows free admission to any active service member who presents a valid military I.D.

Here’s the full text of the press release from the team:

The New York Mets today announced the team has donated 4,000 tickets to military members and their families for tomorrow’s game against the San Francisco Giants at Citi Field.

Working in conjunction with the USO, the Mets distributed 2,000 tickets to tomorrow’s series opening game with the defending World Series champion Giants to all five branches of the military – Army, Navy, Marines, Air Force and Coast Guard.

In addition, the first 2,000 members of the military who show a valid military I.D. at the Day of Game Ticket Sales Window at Citi Field will receive complimentary tickets for themselves and their guests. Military personnel can receive their tickets, limited to six per party, starting two hours before tomorrow’s 7:10 game.

Marine Corps veteran Sgt. Elizabeth Quiñones will sing God Bless America during the seventh-inning stretch of tomorrow’s game.

Today’s donation compliments the Mets’ season-long policy of providing a complimentary ticket to any active service member who presents a valid military I.D. at the Citi Field ticket office.

I would normally say something playfully sarcastic like the Mets can’t give these seats away, but this is a classy move by the organization. I can’t wait to see the atmosphere at Citi Field tomorrow.

Trevor Story homers off of Charlie Morton, All-Star Game tied at two after seven

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There was a whole lot of nothing happening in the All-Star Game after Willson Contreras‘ homer in the bottom of the third. We saw a lot of 98 m.p.h. pitches, a handful of walks and a near total lack of balls in play and/or defensive excitement for three and a half innings. In short: it was classic late 20-teens baseball. The most exciting thing that happened during that span was a trade that everyone knew was happening, even if they didn’t know when it would actually go down.

That changed in the bottom of the seventh when, with Charlie Morton of the Astros on the mound, Rockies shortstop Trevor Story socked one out to left field. There hasn’t been a lot of action tonight, but the action that has gone down has gone down in the left field stands.

It’s 2-2 as we head to the eighth inning.