Kevin Towers used to mess with Brad Penny by altering the radar gun readings in San Diego

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Nick Piecoro of the Arizona Republic has an interesting article about the questionable accuracy of the radar gun readings used on various ballpark scoreboards, which is something I’ve noted in the past regarding people citing velocity figures well beyond a pitcher’s usual range.

It turns out not all of the inaccurate scoreboard readings are on the high side, as current Diamondbacks general manager and former Padres general manager Kevin Towers told Piecoro:

We used to dial it down. I know for a fact that every time Brad Penny pitched for the Dodgers in San Diego it was probably the lowest velocities he ever had. He liked velocity. He’d stare at the board. He was throwing 95-96, but we’d have it at 91 and he’d get pissed off and throw harder and harder and start elevating.

Sure enough, I checked the numbers and Brad Penny is 1-5 with a 6.47 ERA in 10 career games pitched in San Diego. Towers also admitted that the Padres “would bump it up on a couple of our pitchers” because “we felt it gave us an edge.”

Towers is no longer able to mess with the radar gun readings in Arizona because Chase Field utilizes MLB’s pitch-fx technology for scoreboard readings rather than relying on people to record and relay the data. Some teams still rely on those mischievous humans, though, which is why I always trust technology when it comes to miles per hour.

Report: Mariners enter into a ballpark naming rights deal with T-Mobile

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Maury Brown of Forbes reports that T-Mobile will be the new naming rights partner for the Seattle Mariners’ ballpark beginning in 2019. Their park had been known as Safeco Field since it first opened in the summer of 1999. The 20-year naming rights deal with Safeco ended with the close of the 2018 season.

Brown reports that the deal will be around $3 million a year, which doesn’t seem like a whole lot. Then again, I have long been skeptical of how much naming rights actually bring back to the naming rights partner. That’s especially true when the partner is slapping its name on a ballpark that was known as something else beforehand. People tend to still use the old name and, I suspect, resent the new one a bit. Maybe that’s less the case when the park has only been known by corporate names, and no beloved traditional name is being displaced, but I still question if anyone really makes a single purchasing decision based on the name of a ballpark.

I know this much for sure, though: despite the relatively small cost of naming rights here, none of the most notable Seattle-based companies — which include Amazon, Starbucks, Nordstrom, Microsoft, Costco and Alaska Airlines — felt it was worth it. Possibly because they know people are gonna call the place “Safeco” for several years regardless.