Twins trainer says Joe Mauer “wasn’t strong enough” to start season as everyday catcher

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How bad have the mounting injuries gotten for the Twins? Today they had trainer Rick McWane speak directly to the media because Ron Gardenhire was sick of answering all the health-related questions and the front office was likely sick of the manager giving non-expert half-information to frustrated reporters.

McWane gave an update on Joe Mauer’s status, saying the former MVP will meet today with team doctors to determine his recovery timetable.

Mauer is eligible to be activated from the disabled list today, but is not close to returning from bilateral leg weakness and McWane admitted that he “wasn’t strong enough to handle everyday catching” coming out of spring training following offseason knee surgery.

He did anyway, starting nine of the first 10 games behind the plate while hitting just .235, but now Mauer is working to strengthen his legs before hopefully beginning a minor-league rehab assignment early next month. McWane told reporters that “the doctors are very confident that he is perfectly healthy other than the orthopedic soreness that he is currently experiencing.”

Report: Mets sign Brad Brach to one-year, $850,000 contract

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The Athletic’s Ken Rosenthal reports that the Mets and free agent reliever Brad Brach have agreed on a one-year deal worth $850,000. The contract includes a player option for the 2021 season with a base salary of $1.25 million and additional performance incentives.

Brach, 33, signed as a free agent with the Cubs this past February. After posting an ugly 6.13 ERA over 39 2/3 innings, the Cubs released him in early August. The Mets picked him up shortly thereafter. Brach’s performance improved, limiting opposing hitters to six runs on 15 hits and three walks with 15 strikeouts in 14 2/3 innings through the end of the season.

While Brach will add some much-needed depth to the Mets’ bullpen, his walk rate has been going in the wrong direction for the last three seasons. It went from eight percent in 2016 to 9.5, 9.7, and 12.8 percent from 2017-19. Needless to say the Mets are hoping that trend starts heading in the other direction next season.