Jays demote Travis Snider to make room for Rajai Davis

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Apparently, Corey Patterson is a keeper.

The Jays announced after Thursday’s win over the Rangers that they’ve optioned 23-year-old Travis Snider to Triple-A Las Vegas.

Utilityman Chris Woodward was sent outright to the same club.  Rajai Davis is expected to come off the DL and reclaim his spot in center field prior to Friday’s game.

Snider was demoted despite a current five-game hitting streak that had raised his average from .159 to .184. Of course, it was about as weak as hitting streaks get, considering he didn’t have a two-hit game or an extra-base hit during the span. The Jays probably would have been more patient with him if not for the 23 strikeouts in 87 at-bats.

Overall, Snider, who debuted with the Jays as a 20-year-old in 2008, has hit .246/.313/.423 in 699 at-bats as a major leaguer. He’s shown very impressive power at times — he his six homers last September alone — but he’s had big issues making contact (203 strikeouts), and since he’s limited defensively, he’s not an asset while hitting .250, much less .180.

With Snider out of the mix, the Jays will go with Patterson and Juan Rivera in left field for now. Snider should get another chance in a month or so, but if this is a make-or-break year for him in Toronto, it’s certainly off to a rough start.

Minor League Baseball eclipses 40 million in attendance for 14th consecutive season

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Minor League Baseball announced on Wednesday that, for the 14th consecutive season, the league has eclipsed 40 million in total attendance. 20 teams set single-game attendance records and seven teams set franchise records for single-game attendance in their current parks.

ESPN’s Keith Law, who has been covering the minor leagues for quite a while, did the math:

Minor League Baseball president and CEO Pat O’Conner, whose most prominent stint in the public eye involved him disingenuously justifying the underpaying of his players, said, “Minor League Baseball continues to be the best entertainment value in sports, and these numbers support that. For us to top 40 million fans for the 14th consecutive season despite the weather challenges our teams faced in April and May is a testament to the continued support of our loyal fan bases and the creative promotions and hard work done by all of our teams across the country.”

Major and Minor League Baseball are quite happy to make money hand over fist on the backs of their players, but are too cheap to pay them adequately for their labor.