Everyone else is injured, so Ryan Madson finally gets a shot to be Phillies’ closer

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Ryan Madson has been one of the best, most underrated relievers in baseball since moving to the bullpen full time in 2007, but because he didn’t thrive in a few brief opportunities to close games in previous seasons the Phillies have avoided giving him another chance as closer.

Philadelphia wasted no time choosing Jose Contreras as the new closer when Brad Lidge was placed on the disabled list in late March with a shoulder injury, but now that Contreras has joined him on the DL with a bum elbow manager Charlie Manuel and company have little choice but to reluctantly hand ninth-inning duties to Madson.

I’m hoping he thrives as a fill-in closer, not because I have any sort of allegiance to the Phillies but because it would help quiet the notion that the ninth inning is some sort of mythical inning where only a special breed of pitcher can record three outs with a lead of 1-3 runs. Madson is an excellent reliever with a lengthy track record of success in the seventh and eighth innings, and if given an extended opportunity to sink or swim in the ninth inning he can thrive there as well.

The only question is whether the Phillies will stick with Madson if he blows an early save or two, because anything but absolute success in the role will lead to fans and media members banging the “he’s just not a closer” drum. And unfortunately Madson isn’t fully healthy either, with Jim Salisbury of CSNPhilly.com reporting that he “has been battling some arm soreness” and “required days off on Thursday and Sunday.”

All bets are off if Madson is at less than 100 percent, but if he’s healthy the Lidge and Contreras injuries may not be such horrible things if they ultimately force the Phillies to do something they should have done a while ago and give Madson an extended tryout as closer.

Free agent slugger José Abreu signs 3-year, $58.5M deal with Astros

Kamil Krzaczynski-USA TODAY Sports
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HOUSTON — Jose Abreu and the World Series champion Astros agreed to a three-year, $58.5 million contract, adding another powerful bat to Houston’s lineup.

Abreu, the 2020 AL MVP, gets $19.5 million in each of the next three seasons.

He spent his first nine major league seasons with the Chicago White Sox. The first baseman became a free agent after batting .304 with 15 home runs, 75 RBIs and an .824 OPS this year.

With the Astros, he replaces Yuli Gurriel at first base in a batting order that also features All-Star sluggers Yordan Alvarez, Jose Altuve, Alex Bregman and Kyle Tucker.

Gurriel became a free agent after Houston defeated the Philadelphia Phillies this month for its second World Series championship.

The 35-year-old Abreu becomes the biggest free agent to switch teams so far this offseason. Born in Cuba, the three-time All-Star and 2014 AL Rookie of the Year is a .292 career hitter in the majors with 243 homers, 863 RBIs and an .860 OPS.

The Astros announced the signing. Abreu was scheduled to be introduced in a news conference at Minute Maid Park.

He would get a $200,000 for winning an MVP award, $175,000 for finishing second in the voting, $150,000 for third, $125,000 for fourth and $100,000 for fifth. Abreu also would get $100,000 for earning World Series MVP and $75,000 for League Championship Series MVP, $75,000 for making the All-Star team and $75,000 for winning a Gold Glove or a Silver Slugger.

Abreu gets a hotel suite on road trips and the right to buy a luxury suite for all Astros home games.