Everyone else is injured, so Ryan Madson finally gets a shot to be Phillies’ closer

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Ryan Madson has been one of the best, most underrated relievers in baseball since moving to the bullpen full time in 2007, but because he didn’t thrive in a few brief opportunities to close games in previous seasons the Phillies have avoided giving him another chance as closer.

Philadelphia wasted no time choosing Jose Contreras as the new closer when Brad Lidge was placed on the disabled list in late March with a shoulder injury, but now that Contreras has joined him on the DL with a bum elbow manager Charlie Manuel and company have little choice but to reluctantly hand ninth-inning duties to Madson.

I’m hoping he thrives as a fill-in closer, not because I have any sort of allegiance to the Phillies but because it would help quiet the notion that the ninth inning is some sort of mythical inning where only a special breed of pitcher can record three outs with a lead of 1-3 runs. Madson is an excellent reliever with a lengthy track record of success in the seventh and eighth innings, and if given an extended opportunity to sink or swim in the ninth inning he can thrive there as well.

The only question is whether the Phillies will stick with Madson if he blows an early save or two, because anything but absolute success in the role will lead to fans and media members banging the “he’s just not a closer” drum. And unfortunately Madson isn’t fully healthy either, with Jim Salisbury of CSNPhilly.com reporting that he “has been battling some arm soreness” and “required days off on Thursday and Sunday.”

All bets are off if Madson is at less than 100 percent, but if he’s healthy the Lidge and Contreras injuries may not be such horrible things if they ultimately force the Phillies to do something they should have done a while ago and give Madson an extended tryout as closer.

Rays’ Díaz gets $24 million, three-year deal, avoids arbitration

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ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. – Tampa Bay Rays infielder Yandy Díaz agreed to a $24 million, three-year contract on Tuesday that avoided a salary arbitration hearing.

Díaz’s agreement could be worth $36 million over four seasons.

The 31-year old will receive $6 million this season, $8 million in 2024 and $10 million for 2025. The 2026 club is $12 million with no buyout. There is a $1 million assignment bonus that would be payable by receiving team.

Díaz has spent parts of six seasons in the majors with Cleveland (2017-18) and Tampa Bay (2019-22). He has a career average of .278 with 39 home runs and 198 RBIs.

Acquired by the Rays in a three-team trade on Dec. 13, 2018, Díaz hit .296 with nine homers and 57 RBIs in 137 games last season, He career highs with 71 runs, 140 hits, 33 doubles, and 78 walks.

Díaz was the third Rays’ arbitration-eligible player to reach a deal.

Reliever Pete Fairbanks agreed Friday to a $12 million, three-year contract that could be worth up to $24.6 million over four seasons. The 29-year-old right-hander was 0-0 with a 1.13 ERA in 24 appearances last year after beginning the season on the 60-day injured list with a right lat strain.

Left-hander Jeffrey Springs also agreed last week to a $31 million, four-year contract that could be worth $65.75 million over five seasons.

The 30-year-old began last season in the bullpen and transitioned to the starting rotation in May and finished 9-5 with a 2.46 ERA in 33 appearances, including 25 starts.

Tampa Bay remains scheduled for hearings with right-handers Jason Adam and Ryan Thompson, left-hander Colin Poche, and outfielder Harold Ramírez.