Did the Cubs throw the 1918 World Series

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This isn’t exactly new — there was a book written about it a couple of years ago — but the Associated Press is circulating the story in light of some of the relevant documents becoming public, so why not:  Did the Cubs throw the 1918 World Series to the Red Sox, inspiring the White Sox to do the same the next year?

The central piece of evidence is a deposition given by Eddie Cicotte in 1920 in which he suggested that the White Sox got the idea to throw the 1919 World Series from the Cubs. It’s all very vague — Cicotte really just talks about how others on the White Sox talked about how some Cubs players were offered money to do it — but it’s an interesting glimpse all the same.  If the subject interests you, I’d suggest the book linked above, as a couple of readers emailed me within the past hour telling me that it’s pretty decent.  The book’s author is quoted in the AP report.

And if the Cubs did throw the series? Given that the Black Sox did it again the next year and set in motion the new rules of baseball that cracked down on gambling, the Cubs’ legacy of baseball grifting is more a point of ancient history than anything of lasting significance. After all, people don’t talk about 1919 being awful because of how the Cincinnati Reds’ title was sullied. It’s all about the integrity of the game and the changes it brought about. In that respect, it was a travesty for a year, even if it was unknown, but then superseded in significance by the acts of their southside counterparts.

Although, man, if this was discovered before the Red Sox won it all in 2004, it’s possible that Yankees fans would have taken to chanting “1916!” instead of “1918!” to taunt the Bosox. Assuming 1916 wasn’t fixed too.

Report: Nationals sign Matt Adams

Matt Adams
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Free agent first baseman Matt Adams has signed a one-year, $4 million pact with the Nationals, the Athletic’s Ken Rosenthal reports. Official confirmation is still pending completion of a physical.

The 30-year-old infielder will return to familiar turf in Washington after spending the first half of the 2018 season there. He was dealt to the Cardinals in late August for cash considerations and finished the season batting a collective .239/.309/.477 with a career-high 21 home runs, .786 OPS and 0.8 fWAR through 337 plate appearances for the two National League clubs.

Despite his impressive display of power, Adams experienced a significant decline at the plate over the second half of the season, batting well under the Mendoza Line as the Cardinals pushed for a postseason berth against the division-winning Brewers and Wild Card-contending Cubs. Still, he saw enough early success in Washington to merit a second look and should provide a sturdy backup to Ryan Zimmerman at first base in 2019.