The guy who composed “da-da-da-da-da-da … Charge!” is suing everyone

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Good rule to live by in this world: someone owns just about everything. For example, you know that “”da-da-da-da-da-da … Charge!” thing they play at every ballgame? Well …

What you might not know is that a Pompano Beach man says he composed it — and says he is entitled to compensation every time it airs publicly. Bobby Kent, 62, holds a copyright for the song, a 26-measure piece he dubbed Stadium Doodads in the late 1970s. The last part of the song is the popular rally cry.

He’s suing the licensing company that sold the rights to it to sports teams, claiming they haven’t paid him his royalties. And he’s suing the sports teams too. Except the Lakers. They settled with him for $3,000.

Of course, it’s not all that simple: others claim that Bobby Kent didn’t write it himself, and that the USC Marching Band has been using it since the 1950s. Which, if I understand copyright law correctly, somehow requires that Fleetwood Mac be brought into this case too (Note: I don’t understand copyright law. But I do like to listen to “Tusk” a lot because it tends to annoy everyone).

Anyway, there’s no word at press time if Kent is going to recruit the estate of Gioachino Rossini and the guy who came up with this thing to turn this into a “charge!” class action.  And of course, Gary Glitter is unavailable for comment. If he were available, however, he’d likely say “Hey!”

Video: Edwin Encarnación grounds into 5-4-3 triple play

Mike Stobe/Getty Images
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The Yankees threatened early against the Twins in the top of the first inning of Monday night’s game in Minnesota. DJ LeMahieu and Aaron Judge drew leadoff walks Martín Pérez, bringing up slugger Edwin Encarnación. Encarnación battled Pérez, ultimately rolling over on the ninth pitch, a change-up. Third baseman Luis Arraez gobbled it up and stepped on the third base bag, then fired to Jonathan Schoop at second base for the second out. Schoop got the ball over to Miguel Sanó at first base just in time to complete the 5-4-3 triple play.

It’s the second triple play turned this year, as the White Sox also accomplished a 5-4-3 double play on May 22 against the Astros. The Twins’ last triple play occurred on June 1, 2017 against the Angels, also a 5-4-3 triple-killing.

The Yankees were eventually able to generate some offense in the third inning on a Gio Urshela solo homer and an RBI single from Encarnación. It’s a 2-2 game as this gets published.