The guy who composed “da-da-da-da-da-da … Charge!” is suing everyone

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Good rule to live by in this world: someone owns just about everything. For example, you know that “”da-da-da-da-da-da … Charge!” thing they play at every ballgame? Well …

What you might not know is that a Pompano Beach man says he composed it — and says he is entitled to compensation every time it airs publicly. Bobby Kent, 62, holds a copyright for the song, a 26-measure piece he dubbed Stadium Doodads in the late 1970s. The last part of the song is the popular rally cry.

He’s suing the licensing company that sold the rights to it to sports teams, claiming they haven’t paid him his royalties. And he’s suing the sports teams too. Except the Lakers. They settled with him for $3,000.

Of course, it’s not all that simple: others claim that Bobby Kent didn’t write it himself, and that the USC Marching Band has been using it since the 1950s. Which, if I understand copyright law correctly, somehow requires that Fleetwood Mac be brought into this case too (Note: I don’t understand copyright law. But I do like to listen to “Tusk” a lot because it tends to annoy everyone).

Anyway, there’s no word at press time if Kent is going to recruit the estate of Gioachino Rossini and the guy who came up with this thing to turn this into a “charge!” class action.  And of course, Gary Glitter is unavailable for comment. If he were available, however, he’d likely say “Hey!”

Indians activate Francisco Lindor

Francisco Lindor
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The Indians activated shortstop Francisco Lindor in advance of their doubleheader against the Braves, the club announced Saturday. Veteran DH Hanley Ramírez has been designated for assignment in a subsequent roster move.

It’s a welcome change for the Indians, who lost Lindor to a right calf strain at the outset of spring training and saw his recovery timetable extended by a left ankle sprain during one of his rehab games. When healthy, however, the 25-year-old has been nothing short of spectacular. During his 2018 campaign, he received his third consecutive All-Star nomination and finished the season batting .277/.352/.519 with 38 home runs, 25 stolen bases, and a career-best 7.6 fWAR through 745 plate appearances.

Things haven’t gone nearly as well for Ramírez since he inked a minor-league deal with the club in late February. Although he managed to stay relatively injury-free during his first few weeks of the 2019 season, the 35-year-old infielder slashed an underwhelming .184/.298/.327 with three extra bases and eight RBI in 57 PA. Whether or not he’ll find another major-league gig this year remains to be seen.