The guy who composed “da-da-da-da-da-da … Charge!” is suing everyone

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Good rule to live by in this world: someone owns just about everything. For example, you know that “”da-da-da-da-da-da … Charge!” thing they play at every ballgame? Well …

What you might not know is that a Pompano Beach man says he composed it — and says he is entitled to compensation every time it airs publicly. Bobby Kent, 62, holds a copyright for the song, a 26-measure piece he dubbed Stadium Doodads in the late 1970s. The last part of the song is the popular rally cry.

He’s suing the licensing company that sold the rights to it to sports teams, claiming they haven’t paid him his royalties. And he’s suing the sports teams too. Except the Lakers. They settled with him for $3,000.

Of course, it’s not all that simple: others claim that Bobby Kent didn’t write it himself, and that the USC Marching Band has been using it since the 1950s. Which, if I understand copyright law correctly, somehow requires that Fleetwood Mac be brought into this case too (Note: I don’t understand copyright law. But I do like to listen to “Tusk” a lot because it tends to annoy everyone).

Anyway, there’s no word at press time if Kent is going to recruit the estate of Gioachino Rossini and the guy who came up with this thing to turn this into a “charge!” class action.  And of course, Gary Glitter is unavailable for comment. If he were available, however, he’d likely say “Hey!”

Giants CEO Larry Baer likely to be disciplined today

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Steve Berman of The Athletic — known to some as Bay Area Sports Guy – reported overnight that Major League Baseball is likely to hand down discipline to Giants CEO Larry Baer today. Possibly as early as this morning.

As you’ll recall, on March 1, Baer was caught on video having a loud, public argument with his wife during which he tried to rip a cell phone out of her hands, which caused her to tumble off of her chair and to the ground as she screamed “help me!” After a couple of false-start statements in which he seemed to dismiss and diminish the incident, Baer released a second solo statement, apologizing to his wife, children and the Giants organization and saying he would “do whatever it takes to make sure that I never behave in such an inappropriate manner again.”

On March 4, Baer stepped away from the Giants, taking “personal time” and relinquishing his CEO role, at least temporarily. Given Major League Baseball’s domestic violence policy, which does not require criminal charges to trigger discipline — and given how bad a look it would be for Major League Baseball not to take any action against Baer when it is certain that it would take action against a player in a similar scenario — it was only a matter of time before the league added to whatever discipline Baer and the Giants had decided to do on their own accord.

At the time of the incident I detailed Major League Baseball’s history of disciplining owners. As discussed in that post, it’s a tricky business, as owners don’t typically rely on salaries from their team and thus it’s hard to distinguish a suspension from a vacation. The examples cited there, however, at least begin to outline the tools at MLB’s disposal in taking action against Baer, and the league has no doubt been thinking about how to approach the matter for the past month.

We’ll see what they came up with some time today.