Going to a Nats game? You may want to have alternative transportation plans if it runs late

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I lived in the D.C. area for three years and one of the things I loved the most about it was Metro. As far as subway systems go it’s clean, easy-to-navigate and altogether swell.  The only problem — which was way bigger for me when I was 23 than it would be now — is that it closes at around midnight, so if you’re going to a late show or event, you’re on your own for the ride home.

Most Washington Nationals games end well before midnight, but some don’t. Rain delays. Extended extra-inning affairs.  For those sorts of contingencies, the city of Washington pays Metro overtime to run late to accommodate the baseball crowd. But that may not last:

During past seasons, the city covered the costs of bringing in extra trains if there was a long rain delay or an epic 18-inning contest that caused a game to end past Metro’s normal operating hours. But that agreement is unique. All of the other sports teams and concert venues in our area pay Metro for any late-night service. Council Member Tommy Wells says he would like to see the Nationals pick up the tab, which Metro says costs $90,000 per hour.

This service benefits the Nationals first and foremost. Having it there encourages and allows their fans to come to the ballpark in comfort, allows them so buy hot dogs and beer and big foam fingers, knowing that they have a ride home.  I can’t see why the Nationals shouldn’t pay for late service like everyone else does.

Brewers have 3 positive COVID tests at alternate site

Jeff Hanisch-USA TODAY Sports
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MILWAUKEE — The Brewers had two players and a staff member test positive for the coronavirus at their alternate training site in Appleton, Wisconsin.

Milwaukee president of baseball operations David Stearns confirmed the positive results Saturday and said they shouldn’t impact the major league team. Teams are using alternate training sites this season to keep reserve players sharp because the minor league season was canceled due to the pandemic.

Stearns said the positive tests came Monday and did not name the two players or the staff member. Players must give their permission for their names to be revealed after positive tests.

The entire camp was placed in quarantine.

“We have gone through contact tracing,” Stearns said. “We do not believe it will have any impact at all on our major league team. We’ve been fortunate to get through this season relatively unscathed in this area. Unfortunately, we weren’t able to get all the way there at our alternate site.”

Milwaukee entered Saturday one game behind the Reds and Cardinals for second place in the NL Central, with the top two teams qualifying for the postseason.

The Brewers still will be able to take taxi squad players with them on the team’s trip to Cincinnati and St. Louis in the final week of the season. He said those players have had repeated negative tests and the team is “confident” there would be no possible spread of the virus.

“Because of the nature of who these individuals were, it’s really not going to affect the quarantine group at all,” Stearns said. “We’re very fortunate that the group of players who could potentially be on a postseason roster for us aren’t interacting all that much with the individuals that tested positive.”