Mets place Chris Young on disabled list with right biceps tendinitis

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UPDATE: Mets manager Terry Collins tells Adam Rubin of ESPN New York that Dillon Gee is projected to start Sunday’s game while Pat Misch will back up this afternoon’s starter D.J. Carrasco.

12:50 PM: According to Andy McCullough of the Newark Star-Ledger, the Mets have placed Chris Young on the 15-day disabled list with right biceps tendinitis.

Young initially had his Friday start pushed back to Sunday, but appeared good to go after throwing a bullpen session Thursday. The Mets have another doubleheader this afternoon against the Braves, so there were ultimately some concerns that they would be short-handed in the bullpen if Young was forced to leave Sunday’s start due to injury.

Young hasn’t pitched a full season since 2007 due to a variety of injuries and signed with the Mets this offseason at a base salary of $1.1 million. He has a 1.46 ERA and 12/6 K/BB ratio over his first two starts this season.

The Mets have called up left-hander Pat Misch from Triple-A Buffalo to take his place on the active roster, though Sunday’s starter is still TBA.

The Angels are giving managerial candidates a two-hour written test

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Jon Morosi of MLB.com reports that the Los Angeles Angels are administering a two-hour written test to managerial candidates. The test presents “questions spanning analytical, interpersonal and game-management aspects of the job,” according to Morosi.

I can’t find any reference to it, but I remember another team doing some form of written testing for managerial candidates within the past couple of years. Questions which presented tactical dilemmas, for example. I don’t recall it being so intense, however. And then, as now, I have a hard time seeing experienced candidates wanting to sit for a two-hour written exam when their track record as a manager, along with an interview to assess compatibility should cover most of it. Just seems like an extension of the current trend in which front offices are taking away authority and, with this, some measure of professional respect, from managers.