Marginal celebrities are not concerned about the Red Sox

21 Comments

I think everyone who works in baseball is tired of talking about whether the Red Sox will turn it around.  So it’s nice that some people from the larger world of entertainment are picking up the slack.

First comes a guy who I wouldn’t have guessed would have an ESPN column someday, former Guns ‘N Roses bassist Duff McKagan:

But before any of us gets a little too far ahead of ourselves, let’s just remember that we are only 10 games into the season. Before we state that the Cleveland Indians are going all of the way, or that the Red Sox are already out of it, let us remember how small of a fraction this first 10 games is to the rest of the season.

Actually, McKagan’s column is a lot better than what a lot of full-time sports columnists pass off. Which is the dirty little secret of sports writing, even if it shouldn’t be a secret: all you really need is to (a) know sports; and (b) be able to write.  There aren’t some other magical requirements. And in no case do having other such magical requirements make up for not knowing sports and not knowing how to write. So if you want to be a sports writer, just get in the ring. It’s so easy!

More troubling are the comments of one Charlie Sheen. Who has a long and established track record of knowing baseball, but who has become something less than a reliable analyst on a host of matters in recent months.  What say you about the Bosox, Charlie?

“I’d tell everybody to shut up, that they’ll bounce back. It’s a long season and there’s a ton of talent there and a really bitchin’ hitter’s park they play in. Relax.”

In other words, the Red Sox are totally screwed.

Now, I’m off to see what Kirk Cameron and Mr. T. have to say about John Lackey’s velocity.

Gio González exits NLCS Game 4 start after twisting ankle

Harry How/Getty Images
Leave a comment

Brewers starter Gio González was forced to exit his NLCS Game 4 start against the Dodgers in the second inning after twisting his left ankle attempting to field a comebacker hit by Yasiel Puig. González leaped, deflected the ball and twisted his ankle landing, then went after the ball but Puig reached base easily.

The Brewers’ trainer and manager Craig Counsell came out to the mound to observe González throwing some practice pitches. He was clearly in pain but was allowed to stay in. He threw one pitch to Austin Barnes and very visibly grimaced after completing his wind-up. Counsell came back out to the mound and took a visibly upset González out of the game. Freddy Peralta came in relief to finish out the at-bat. González probably shouldn’t have been allowed to stay in the game in the first place, but sometimes a player’s competitiveness is enough to convince a manager and a trainer.

Upon entering, Peralta issued a walk to Austin Barnes, then got the first out when Rich Hill laid down a mediocre bunt, allowing Peralta to get the lead runner at third base. Peralta struck out Chris Taylor and walked Justin Turner to load the bases with two outs. Dodgers manager Dave Roberts opted to pinch-hit for David Freese with Max Muncy, who struck out looking. Peralta was somehow able to slither out of the jam.

Gonzalez pitched two innings in NLCS Game 1 on Friday. He was quite good after joining the Brewers in a late-August trade with the Nationals, compiling a 2.13 regular season ERA in five starts with his new club. The Brewers will likely provide an update on his status after Tuesday night’s game.