John Steigerwald explains himself

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John Steigerwald — the guy who blamed Bryan Stow for his own beating in a recent column — took to his blog today to say that he did not blame Bryan Stow for his own beating.  The blog has been flooded with traffic so it’s been down much of the afternoon, but here’s a Google Cache version of it:

I don’t apologize for the column but I do apologize to the Stow family if this nonsense has reached them and in any way added to their pain. I don’t, for one second, blame Brian Stow for the beating he took. I do blame the ever increasing out of control, out of perspective behavior by fans, too many of whom are no longer satisfied with going to their stadiums and cheering for their teams. And I sure as hell don’t think –as some hysterical posters have claimed –that Brian “had it coming.”

Steigerwald also says “Nowhere did I imply that Stow deserved what happened to him. I thought that the difference between DESERVING a consequence and unwittingly contributing to one was implicit.”

I and tons of other people linked his first column and said our piece, so now we link his explanation and let him say his. I’ll leave it to you to decide if he sufficiently acquits himself. In the meantime, I’d suggest that Steigerwald look up the definition of the word “imply.”

Kris Medlen retires from baseball

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Diamondbacks right-hander Kris Medlen has announced his retirement from baseball, writes Zach Buchanan of The Athletic. According to a team official, Medlen forewent his scheduled start for Triple-A Reno on Saturday. The Diamondbacks have yet to officially confirm the report.

The 32-year-old righty inked a minor league deal with Arizona prior to the 2018 season and was eventually recalled for a spot start in early May. He lasted four innings on seven runs, four walks and four strikeouts in his first and only loss of the year. Things didn’t go any smoother in Triple-A, where he went 0-5 in seven starts with a 5.03 ERA, 4.0 BB/9 and 7.7 SO/9 across 34 innings.

Medlen will hang up his cleats after completing an eight-year track in the majors with the Braves, Royals and Diamondbacks. He delivered his strongest performance in Atlanta during the 2012 season, posting a 10-1 record in 12 starts and delivering a cumulative 1.57 ERA, 1.5 BB/9 and 7.8 SO/9 across 138 innings out of the rotation and bullpen. Two Tommy John surgeries took their toll on Medlen, however, limiting his effectiveness off the mound and preventing him from duplicating those career-high numbers in back-to-back stints with the Royals and D-backs. Notwithstanding his post-recovery struggles, the veteran righty will top off his career with a respectable 3.33 ERA and 9.1 fWAR, two complete games, and three playoff runs — including a World Series championship with the 2015 Royals.