What’s the deal with all of the oblique injuries?

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That’s a question we’ve asked around here a lot lately, although we’re doing it more or less rhetorically. Michael S. Schmidt of the New York Times really wanted to know, so he asked Stan Conte, the Dodgers head trainer about it.  Conte researched such injuries and discovered that, no, this was not just a matter of us paying closer attention to such injuries: He found that four players had gone on the disabled list with what he calls “core” injuries — which include obliques — at this point a year ago. But 14 have this season. This represents the biggest spike in such injuries in the last 20 years.

Conte’s belief: the shorter time between the start of spring training and the beginning of spring training games this year, plus the earlier start to the regular season, due to the compressed schedule.  This is bolstered by data showing that oblique injuries are typically far more prevalent in the early part of the season and tail off as the year goes on.

Personally, I blame “Jersey Shore” and its message that men need six packs in order to fulfill the, um, Situational ideal. As a result, too much work on strengthening abs that in turn put too much stress on the surrounding muscles. Conte dismisses the notion, saying that working on ab muscles is a good thing. He thinks it’s a matter of not enough stretching and conditioning and not enough reps in the cage to get ready. Too many serious swings too fast.

Considering Conte’s experience and expertise, and considering that I just made up my explanation with no training or research whatsoever in order to shoe-horn in a cultural reference, I’m going to grudgingly admit that Conte may be right.

Rakuten Golden Eagles sign Jabari Blash

Jabari Blash
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Former Angels outfielder Jabari Blash has signed a one-year deal with the Tohoku Rakuten Golden Eagles of Nippon Professional Baseball, the team announced Friday. Per the Japan Times, the deal is said to be worth around $1.06 million. Blash was released from his contract with the Angels at the end of November.

The 29-year-old outfielder has had a rough go of it in the majors, where he failed to duplicate the promising results he delivered in the minors. While he consistently batted above .250 with 20-30 home runs per season at the Double- and Triple-A level, he petered out in back-to-back gigs with the Padres and Angels and slumped toward a .103/.200/.128 finish across 45 PA for Anaheim in 2018.

The hope, of course, is that the environment in NPB will help him get a better handle on his issues at the plate — in a best case scenario, resulting in a full-scale transformation that could make him more marketable to MLB teams in the future. To that end, Blash expects to be utilized as a cleanup batter in the Eagles’ lineup and will focus on assisting the club as they make a run toward the Japan Series.