About those glossy free agent brochures …

14 Comments

Scott Boras famously makes up these big crazy notebooks for his free agent clients, talking up their skills, their marketability and all of that. This past winter we heard about how Carl Crawford’s agent, Brian Peters, made up an iPad presentation (along with a free iPad) for teams interesting in his client’s services.  I always wonder why agents think that baseball teams with sophisticated scouting departments and oodles of video on everyone would want such things, but I think we get a good idea of it in Ken Rosenthal’s notes column this morning:

“It was an innovative idea, and we got a chuckle out of it, though it didn’t really do anything to change our evaluation,” Red Sox GM Theo Epstein says … Crawford said he initially saw no need for the video, telling Peters, “the teams know what I do, man.” But he acknowledged that the finished product was “nice to see” …

It’s to impress the clients, right?  To make the player (a) feel like he’s awesome; and (b) feel like the agent is going working his butt off on his behalf.  It’s a client retention device, not a marketing device.

Or am I nuts?

Ex-Angels employee charged in overdose death of Tyler Skaggs

AP Photo
4 Comments

FORT WORTH, Texas — A former Angels employee has been charged with conspiracy to distribute fentanyl in connection with last year’s overdose death of Angels pitcher Tyler Skaggs, prosecutors in Texas announced Friday.

Eric Prescott Kay was arrested in Fort Worth, Texas, and made his first appearance Friday in federal court, according to Erin Nealy Cox, the U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Texas. Kay was communications director for the Angels.

Skaggs was found dead in his hotel room in the Dallas area July 1, 2019, before the start of what was supposed to be a four-game series against the Texas Rangers. The first game was postponed before the teams played the final three games.

Skaggs died after choking on his vomit with a toxic mix of alcohol and the powerful painkillers fentanyl and oxycodone in his system, a coroner’s report said. Prosecutors accused Kay of providing the fentanyl to Skaggs and others, who were not named.

“Tyler Skaggs’s overdose – coming, as it did, in the midst of an ascendant baseball career – should be a wake-up call: No one is immune from this deadly drug, whether sold as a powder or hidden inside an innocuous-looking tablet,” Nealy Cox said.

If convicted, Kay faces up to 20 years in prison. Federal court records do not list an attorney representing him, and an attorney who previously spoke on his behalf did not immediately return a message seeking comment.