Manny Ramirez by the numbers

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Forgetting all of the other stuff for a moment, let’s marvel at just how good of a hitter Manny Ramirez was over the course of 19 major league seasons.

– Ramirez finishes his career with a .312/.411/.585 line.  He ranks 87th all-time in average, 32nd in on-base percentage and ninth in slugging percentage.  His .996 career OPS ranks ninth all-time:

1. Babe Ruth – 1.164
2. Ted Williams – 1.116
3. Lou Gehrig – 1.080
4. Barry Bonds – 1.051
5. Albert Pujols – 1.048
6. Jimmie Foxx – 1.038
7. Hank Greenberg – 1.017
8. Rogers Hornsby – 1.010
9. Ramirez – .996
10. Mark McGwire – .982

– 14th all-time with 555 homers.
– 18th all-time with 1,831 RBI
– 24th all-time with 547 doubles
– 26th all-time with 4,826 total bases
– 56th all-time with 1,544 runs scored
– 82nd all-time with 2,574 hits
– 11th all-time with 216 intentional walks
– 13th all-time with 14.9 AB/HR

– Ramirez is 42nd all-time in times on base, compared to just 131st in outs made.

– Ramirez had four 40-homer seasons, leading the AL in 2004 with 43 homers.

– His 165-RBI campaign in 1999 gives him the highest total anyone has amassed since Jimmie Foxx drove in 175 runs for the Red Sox in 1938.

– Ramirez led the AL in OPS in 1999, 2000 and 2004 and finished second on three other occasions. From 1999-2004, he never finished with an OPS under 1.000.

– He led the AL in OBP in 2002, 2003 and 2006.

– Ramirez hit 21 grand slams, which ranks second in MLB history behind Gehrig’s 23.

– Joined with David Ortiz in finishing with a .300 average, 40 homers and 100 RBI in 2004, making them the first pair of teammates to do so since Ruth and Gehrig in 1931.

– Hit .295/.394/.544 in 111 postseason games, playing for two World Series winners with the Red Sox in 2004 and 2007. In 2004, he was the World Series MVP.

– Ranks first all-time with 29 postseason homers, seven more than Bernie Williams. He’s second to Williams with 78 RBI.