Miguel Cabrera hits 250th career homer before 28th birthday

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Last night Miguel Cabrera smacked his 250th career homer, which is remarkable considering he won’t be 28 years old for another two weeks.

Cabrera’s birthday is April 18, which means this is officially his “age-28 season.” Here are the all-time leaders in homers through age 28:

Alex Rodriguez 381
Ken Griffey Jr. 350
Jimmie Foxx. 343
Eddie Mathews 338
Mickey Mantle 320
Albert Pujols 319
Mel Ott 306
Andruw Jones 301
Juan Gonzalez 301
Hank Aaron 298

Cabrera doesn’t crack the top 10, but he is tied for 17th with Willie Mays and still has another 157 games to add to his through-age-28 total. He’s averaged 36 homers per season since joining the Tigers, so assuming he ends up with a total of 36 this year Cabrera will finish his age-28 season with 288, which would rank 12th all time sandwiched between Frank Robinson (291) and Adam Dunn (278).

Kershaw-Sale anything but a pitcher’s duel

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World Series Game 1 was billed as a battle of aces, the Dodgers’ Clayton Kershaw against Chris Sale of the Red Sox. Between them, they have 14 All-Star Game nominations. Kershaw has won three Cy Young Awards. Sale could his first Cy Young Award this year. Among his 10 seasons with at least 110 innings pitched, Kershaw has never posted a sub-2.92 ERA. Sale has been at 2.90 or below in each of the last two seasons. The two have combined for over 4,000 career strikeouts and both have averaged better than a strikeout per inning over their careers.

And yet Tuesday’s Game 1 was anything but a pitcher’s duel between Kershaw and Sale. Though a couple of fielding mistakes weren’t of any help to Kershaw in the first inning, Red Sox batters were squaring him up good. Of the five balls put in play in the first inning, three had exit velocities of 100 MPH or higher. Of the 12 total balls put in play against him overall, five reached triple digits in exit velo.

Kershaw gave up a pair of runs in the first, another run in the third on a J.D. Martinez double to straightaway center field, and another two in the fifth. Kershaw led off the fifth by walking Mookie Betts, then giving up a single to Andrew Benintendi, ending his night. Ryan Madson relieved Kershaw and proceeded to allow both inherited runners to score. All told, Kershaw yielded five runs on seven hits and three walks with five strikeouts on 79 pitches in four-plus innings.

Sale, meanwhile, was on the hook for individual runs in the second, third, and fifth. Dodger hitters weren’t squaring him up quite as well as the Red Sox batters squared up Kershaw, but Sale was still more hittable than usual. Of the eight balls put in play against him, four were at least 90 MPH in exit velo. One of the runs was a no-doubt solo home run to Matt Kemp in the second. The Dodgers chased Sale in the fifth when he issued a leadoff walk to Brian Dozier. Matt Barnes relieved him allowed the inherited runner to score. Overall, Sale threw 91 pitches in four-plus innings, serving up three runs on five hits and two walks with seven strikeouts.

The game is now, as has been generally the case throughout this postseason, a battle of the bullpens.